New gTLDs hit 5 million

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) launched the application process for new generic top-level domains (gTLDs) in January 2012. The new gTLD programme will result in an unprecedented expansion of the Domain Name System from the existing 22 TLDs, such as ‘.com’ and ‘.org’, to over 1,400 TLDs.

While a handful of new gTLDs appear to be…

Article source: http://www.worldtrademarkreview.com/Daily/Detail.aspx?g=6e4402cb-5536-4376-b220-1a091285ab7e

Name.com: 50% Off Premium Priced Domains On 4 New gTLD’s Extension For 2 …

The domain name registrar, Name.com is offering 50% of of premium registrations (first year only) for the following new gTLD  extensions today only for 2 hours:

.CONSULTING
.SOFTWARE
.MARKET
.REVIEWS.

The Domain Happy Hour is from 3–5 p.m. MST today.

“That includes some pretty great available premiums, like Colorado.market, StockMarket.consulting, Action.software, and Gaming.reviews.”

The promo code will be revealed on the Happy Hour page at 3 p.m. Thursday.

“The Promotion does not apply to premium renewals or platinum premium registrations.”

Article source: http://www.thedomains.com/2015/05/21/name-com-50-off-premium-priced-domains-on-4-new-gtlds-extension-for-2-hours-today/

Watch: Raspberry Pi Clone Lemon Pi Running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Android 5.0

You should know that there’s an on-going Indiegogo campaign (with flexible funding) for a new computer board called Lemon Pi and developed by the EMBEDSTUDIO Chinese company.

From the looks of it, Lemon Pi is a Raspberry Pi clone, but with some powerful specifications that we’ve summarized for you below. An interesting fact about this SBC Single Board Computer) is that it claims to support the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) Linux operating system, as well as Android 5.0.

Lemon Pi boasts an ARM Actions Semi S500 Quad-core Cortex A9r4 processor with a PowerVR SGX544 GPU that supports OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0, OpenCL, and OpenVG 1.0.1, and 512KB L2 cache, 1GB DDR3 RAM, Micro SD slot, HDMI 1.4 with HDCP video output, and HDMI audio.

Additionally, Lemon Pi includes a 10/100M Ethernet port (RJ45), 2x USB 2.0 ports, 1x USB 3.0 port (OTG), MIPI CSI-2 interface, a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible header with 16 GPIOs, PCM, I2C, PCM, UART, and SPI, IR receiver, as well as ADFU (Actions Device Firmware Update), Reset, and On/Off keys.

If you want a piece of the Lemon Pi, you should hurry and get yours for no more than $30 (€27) – only two left at this price at the moment of writing this article. In the meantime, watch the video below to see the Lemon Pi computer board in action with the Ubuntu and Android operating systems.

Play Video

Article source: http://linux.softpedia.com/blog/Watch-Raspberry-Pi-Clone-Lemon-Pi-Running-Ubuntu-12-04-LTS-and-Android-5-0-481960.shtml

UK Government Analyzes Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Security

The UK government releases every year a security guidance that details various problems and security problems that are identified in systems used by the authorities. They also revealed some issues with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, although it’s not something major.

Ubuntu is the most used Linux operating system, so it’s not really a surprise that security assessments made by governments are a real thing. On the other hand, this is not the first time the UK government made this analysis of Ubuntu, and in fact, they have recommended it before as the most secure option on the market.

The analysis of the system is done by CESG, which is UK’s National Technical Authority on Information Assurance, and one of the roles of this organization is to provide advice to UK government entities and organizations providing services to UK government. Since Ubuntu can be found in parts of the administration, it needs to undergo a certain amount of scrutiny.

Ubuntu could be more secure

Even if Ubuntu is a Linux operating system, it doesn’t mean that it’s infallible. It has its problems like any other operating system, but they don’t have anything to do with viruses or malware, the problems that can be usually encountered in a Windows OS. The issues covered by the CESG report cover much more specific topics.

The organization tests against many scenarios and publishes its findings and recommendation in a comprehensive report, which is freely distributed, and everyone can take a look at it. Here are just a couple of critical issues identified:

“Ubuntu does not use any dedicated hardware to protect its disk encryption keys. If an attacker can get physical access to the device, they can perform an offline brute-force attack to recover the encryption password.”

“The VPN has not been independently assured to Foundation Grade. Without assurance in the VPN, there is a risk that data transiting from the device could be compromised,” is noted in the report.

There are a lot more issues in the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Security Guidance, but you will have to keep in mind that the scenarios are about usage in various enterprise configurations it’s not aimed at regular users.

Article source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/UK-Government-Analyzes-Ubuntu-14-04-Security-481973.shtml

Canonical Brings Snappy Ubuntu Linux to Raspberry Pi

VIDEO: Canonical shows off its Orange Match Box appliance that runs Ubuntu’s Snappy Linux at the OpenStack Summit.

VANCOUVER, British Columbia–At the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta back in 2014, Canonical, the lead commercial sponsor behind Ubuntu Linux, demonstrated its new Orange Box server. At the OpenStack Summit here this week, Canonical is now demonstrating a smaller box dubbed the Orange Match Box, which is a Raspberry Pi 2 in a custom case running Ubuntu’s Snappy Linux.
In a video interview with eWEEK, Dustin Kirkland, product manager at Canonical, detailed what the Orange Match Box is all about.
“Snappy is the smallest, most secure Ubuntu that we have ever created,” Kirkland said. “It’s a very efficient lean base for building appliances.”
Snappy was first announced in December 2014 and became generally available with the Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet release on April 23. Canonical is also working with General Electric to embed Snappy in refrigerators and is building Snappy for network switches as well.

Watch the full video below:



Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at eWEEK and InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Article source: http://www.eweek.com/pc-hardware/canonical-brings-snappy-ubuntu-linux-to-the-raspberry-pi.html

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to Land on October 22 – Softpedia

The release schedule for Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) has been finalized, and we now have all the intermediary steps and the launch date for the next operating system from Canonical.

One of the reasons Ubuntu is so popular is the fact that a new version arrives every six months, like clockwork. It might not seem like a big deal, but it is. It’s very hard to give a precise date for a launch, especially when it’s an operating system. It means that developers usually have less than six months to make all changes they want and need.

At the beginning of a new Ubuntu cycle, the OS brings all the latest packages from the Debian testing branch and the work starts, almost immediately after the previous launch. It takes at least a couple of months to see any major differences, although it’s quite likely that nothing out of the ordinary will be implemented in all this time. The Ubuntu development is done with small little steps, not with big leaps. Each new release might seem a little boring when compared with the previous version, but it should be compared with something released two years back, and the differences will be more than obvious.

Ubuntu 15.10 to land on October 22

In case you didn’t already know, Ubuntu version numbers are actually indicative of the launch date. For example, Ubuntu 15.10 means that the system will be launched in 2015, in October (the tenth month). Ubuntu 16.04 means that it will be released in 2016, in April.

The preliminary release for Ubuntu 15.10 has been published for a week now, but the devs needed to know if something could have gotten in the way of their releases, like conferences or other events. From the looks of it, the schedule hasn’t changed, and Ubuntu 15.10 will arrive on October 22.

Ubuntu no longer has intermediate releases, with just one exception

There are many different Ubuntu flavors, and they each do their own thing. Some of them still follow the regular releases, with Alphas and Betas, others don’t. Ubuntu has a single Beta release near the end of the cycle.

The first Alpha version for Ubuntu flavors will land on June 25, the second Alpha on July 30, and the first Beta should be ready on August 27. The last Beta in the series, which will also include the officially flavor, will land on September 24.

Enjoy!

Article source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/Ubuntu-15-10-Wily-Werewolf-to-Land-on-October-22-481846.shtml

Ubuntu Metered, Cloud-Style Storage Pricing Rolled Out – Big Data on Top Tech …

Canonical is thinking out of the box and putting its innovation on display at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, Canada this week with a software Relevant Products/Services-defined storage Relevant Products/Services support service that gives enterprise Relevant Products/Services IT maximum flexibility. It’s called Ubuntu Advantage Storage.

Simply stated, Canonical is now offering metered support plans with prices based on the amount of data Relevant Products/Services written. That strays from the traditional approach, which tallies the number or size of disks or machines used to provide the service.

Canonical is offering this support with optional L3 escalation. Both open source technologies like Ceph and Swift and vendor solutions from Nexenta, Swiftstack and other third-party providers are included in the portfolio.

Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, said customers “prefer on-demand usage-based pricing.” He’s betting the new automated management and integration will be especially attractive for companies with smaller clusters that still want a top-notch experience out of the gate.


Dynamically Increase Storage

Ubuntu Advantage storage gives enterprise IT more choices. Enterprises, for example, can deploy scale-out storage technology onto their commodity hardware infrastructures and still distinguish between supported and unsupported clusters. IT can also route support calls to a range of specialist providers through Canonical as the common L1 support provider.

But what has the industry talking is the ability to dynamically increase storage capacity by adding more machines or disks to the cluster. It’s turning heads because NAS and SAN arrays, by contrast, require up-front commitment to large amounts of capacity and are difficult to scale incrementally.

“SwiftStack was founded to give enterprises the benefits of OpenStack Swift without having to develop their own management stack,“ said Joe Arnold, co-founder and chief product officer at SwiftStack. “Programs like Ubuntu Advantage Storage help enterprises choose the engine that powers the world’s largest storage clouds with SwiftStack, the certified object storage distro in the OpenStack Marketplace.”


Cloud-Style Economics

With Ubuntu Advantage Storage, there is no duplication of costs for replicas. Customers don’t pay for empty space like they would on modern public cloud Relevant Products/Services storage services. The model was inspired by the pay-for-what-you-use approach that’s prevalent in the cloud storage services world.

“Bringing cloud-style pricing to the on-premise market is a key step in the evolution of private cloud,” said Christian Reis, vice president of Hyperscale and Storage at Canonical. “Customers now have utility-based pricing for an open portfolio of software-defined storage solutions from a wide range of competing and innovating players, all under one program, on whatever commodity hardware they prefer.”

The service includes storage software, deployment and management tools, security Relevant Products/Services and stability updates, reference architectures, knowledge base access and 24-7 commercial support. Price starts from $0.022 per usable GB per month.

“The pace of data creation is exploding. As unstructured data fills disks and data retention policies lengthen, every organization must grow their storage infrastructure Relevant Products/Services,” said Jane Silber, CEO at Canonical. “Organizations facing the imperative to scale need cloud-style economics in the pricing of software and services, and that’s what the Ubuntu Advantage Storage service offers. ”


Simple Measurements

We asked Zeus Kerravala, principal analyst at ZK Research, for his thoughts on the new pricing paradigm. He told us this is a smart move by Ubuntu.

“This is the way IT is going, particularly now that more line of business managers are getting involved in IT purchases. More and more you are seeing organizations want the ability to pay for their IT infrastructure on a utilization basis,” Kerravala said. “There are lots of different ways you can measure utilization, but what they came up with is pretty simple: You store more, you pay more. To me, it’s a simple way to be able to pay for storage and in line with the way cloud and IT is going.”

Article source: http://www.toptechnews.com/article/index.php?story_id=1110098G3SWR

Dell Launches Cheap Ubuntu-Powered Inspiron 15 3000 Series – Softpedia

Dell is one of the most important providers of Ubuntu-powered hardware, and the company has just released a new laptop called Inspiron 15 3000 Series Laptop Ubuntu Edition.

Companies like Dell or IBM have helped to make Ubuntu much more popular because they sell a lot of hardware, and they are shipping that hardware with Ubuntu preinstalled. It might not seem like a big deal. After all, you can always install something else, but many customers don’t switch to a different OS and Ubuntu remains installed.

It also helps the fact that Dell, despite its big name, still has some very affordable laptop and netbooks. Because they ship with Ubuntu and not Windows the price of the device is lower, making these versions a very good choice.

Inspiron 15 3000 is not a powerhouse

There is a very good reason Inspiron 15 3000 is a rather cheap laptop. The price starts at $250 (€224), but it goes up when you change the hardware configuration. If you just need something for office and Internet browsing, you won’t be disappointed by the results.

The cheapest configuration features an Intel Celeron® Processor (Dual Core), 4GB of RAM, and 500GB HDD. On the other side of the spectrum, we have Intel Pentium Processor (Quad Core), 4GB RAM, 500GB HDD, and two years of warranty (instead of one). This version costs $350 (€313). It’s also worth mentioning that all versions come with a 15.6-inch HD (1366 x 768) Truelife LED-Backlit display.

“Get exactly what you want with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, the popular OS including Google Chrome browser, five years of free security and maintenance updates. The Dell Inspiron 15 3000 Series Laptop is equipped with the latest processors from Intel, with responsive performance for all your tasks from surfing the web, writing a term paper, editing video or doing web chats,” reads the official website.

More details about the Inspiron 15 3000 series can be found on the website.

Article source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/Dell-Launches-Cheap-Ubuntu-Powered-Inspiron-15-3000-Series-481873.shtml

‘Bag snatchers’ feel ubuntu wrath – Crime & Courts | IOL News

INDEPENDENT MEDIA
Two men were left bloodied and bruised after snatching a womans handbag as she headed for the Bree Street taxi rank. File Photo: Wesley Fester

Johannesburg – A man sat on the pavement in Newtown, blood bubbling in his nose. Flies sat on the blood caked on his head, as he avoided the gaze of the jeering crowd.

His accomplice lay on his belly about two steps from him, also uncuffed, with both hands covering his face.

The circle of people around them grew as more stopped to ask: “What did they do?” to other bystanders, but not to the Joburg Metro Police Department officers parked nearby.

At about 3pm on Wednesday, the two had tried to snatch a woman’s bag as she headed for the Bree Street taxi rank.

She cried out for help and Xolani Mthembu did not stop to think how far his smart shoes would carry him, or how his shirt would constrict him. He just lept into action.

“I was walking to my car and heard her screaming. I ran towards the robbers and my brother followed me,” he said.

Two taxi drivers noticed the commotion and stopped their vehicles to join the chase. “They caught the one guy and I caught the other. He tried to snap away, but I kicked him and trapped him.”

The businessman said the young bag-owner cried tears of gratitude when he returned her possession.

People laughed and pointed at the thwarted alleged thieves. “They’re lucky the police came so soon,” said one onlooker, sneering. “We would’ve dragged them behind a car”.

As one of the suspects sat up, his eye swollen shut, Mthembu added: “We like to keep our town as safe as possible.”

lerato.mbangeni@inl.co.za

The Star

Article source: http://www.iol.co.za/news/crime-courts/bag-snatchers-feel-ubuntu-wrath-1.1861672

Canonical Brings Snappy Ubuntu Linux to Raspberry Pi – eWeek

VIDEO: Canonical shows off its Orange Match Box appliance that runs Ubuntu’s Snappy Linux at the OpenStack Summit.

VANCOUVER, British Columbia–At the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta back in 2014, Canonical, the lead commercial sponsor behind Ubuntu Linux, demonstrated its new Orange Box server. At the OpenStack Summit here this week, Canonical is now demonstrating a smaller box dubbed the Orange Match Box, which is a Raspberry Pi 2 in a custom case running Ubuntu’s Snappy Linux.
In a video interview with eWEEK, Dustin Kirkland, product manager at Canonical, detailed what the Orange Match Box is all about.
“Snappy is the smallest, most secure Ubuntu that we have ever created,” Kirkland said. “It’s a very efficient lean base for building appliances.”
Snappy was first announced in December 2014 and became generally available with the Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet release on April 23. Canonical is also working with General Electric to embed Snappy in refrigerators and is building Snappy for network switches as well.

Watch the full video below:



Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at eWEEK and InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Article source: http://www.eweek.com/pc-hardware/canonical-brings-snappy-ubuntu-linux-to-the-raspberry-pi.html

Mark Shuttleworth: Why Ubuntu mobile really matters | ZDNet

markshuttleworth2015may220x272.jpg
Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth: We had this vision some time ago for lining up your phone and tablet and PC experiences so that they could be a single device. People thought that was nuts.
Image: Canonical

As a major Chinese manufacturer launches a new Ubuntu-based smartphone that’s also bound for Europe, Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth this week conceded that the odds are stacked against the Linux-based OS succeeding in the role of phone-cum-desktop PC.

On Monday, the Chinese firm Meizu, backed by China Mobile, released the Ubuntu MX4 smartphone to developers in China, with a European launch planned for the near future.

The first Ubuntu phone, the Aquaris E4.5, made by Canonical partner bq, a Spanish electronics retailer, went on sale online in Europe in February.

Shuttleworth said it was important that Ubuntu remains relevant as people shift to using multiple devices for personal computing.

“We had this vision some time ago for lining up your phone and tablet and PC experiences so that they could be a single device,” Shuttleworth said

“People thought that was nuts. But Microsoft’s saying the same thing – maybe not so nuts, after all? Our implementation of that is quite a bit more elegant than Windows 8, so we’ll see.”

Earlier this month, Shuttleworth said an Ubuntu smartphone that can work as a desktop will launch in 2015. It is an idea he pursued unsuccessfully in 2013 with the Edge. Microsoft recently unveiled the Continuum feature at the BUILD conference, which changes the Windows Phone interface to allow handsets to be used as PCs when connected to a monitor.

But Shuttleworth, who founded Canonical in 2004, said Ubuntu’s role as a mobile operating system is yielding benefits that go well beyond smartphones.

“The interplay between these things is really rich and really interesting. I understand why people say, ‘It’s kind of crazy – what are you doing, making a phone?’. But look at all the amazing things that have come from it,” he said.

“If you take the GUI out of that phone experience, what did we have to do? We have to get that small to fit on a phone. We had to get it secure, we had to isolate applications from each other and we had to make it possible to update first time, every time remotely, without any kind of management software.

“All of those underpinnings are now our IoT [Internet of Things] platform as well. The latest greatest switch is running Ubuntu. What is it? It’s our mobile operating system without the phone UI but it’s got all the same properties.”

Effectively, the development of Ubuntu as a mobile OS has helped Canonical gain a foothold in the internet of things.

“We’re in IoT in a way we never could have been. We don’t have the economics for it, or the tools for it, or the developer engagement for it, or the mindset for it. There we are. All we had to do was take the GUI out of it. It’s beautiful,” Shuttleworth said.

“We’ve got robots with snappy Ubuntu, we’ve got switches with Snappy Ubuntu, we’ve got cars that are going to be shipping with Snappy Ubuntu. All that is our mobile platform, just without the GUI. We could never have predicted that four years ago.”

He said the internet of things is interesting because it will bring as much intelligence to, say, a wall-mounted domestic phone as there is in a smartphone, together with applications and the intelligence to make real decisions about its environment.

“While IoT is kind of industrial and not as personal, it’s going to be a really good business. We’re delighted that we’re being pulled onto switches. We’re not a switch OS – that magic is being handled by professionals. But we’re a great general platform,” he said.

Shuttleworth said the adoption of Ubuntu by Meizu represents the easiest way for the Chinese company to break out of China because Google restricts how Android can be used by manufacturers outside China.

“Those developers have worked their heart out. They shipped a phone. China Mobile, Meizu – they’re keen to ship that phone in China. Why on earth would I say no? Give them room to run and see what they do.”

More on mobile and IoT

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/article/mark-shuttleworth-why-ubuntu-mobile-really-matters/

The Meizu X4 is the first compelling Ubuntu phone | PCWorld

We’ve been hearing about Meizu’s forthcoming Ubuntu-powered smartphone since early 2014—more than a year ago. Well, all those words just became tangible, and they’ve coalesced into the first compelling-looking Ubuntu phone.

The Ubuntu MX4 is now out and can be purchased from Meizu’s website in China. Meizu’s Ubuntu phone follows in the footsteps of the Bq Aquaris, which is now on sale across Europe. The second Ubuntu smartphone will also be on sale in Europe soon.

Let’s dig into the specs first. Meizu’s MX4 Ubuntu edition is a higher-end phone than Bq’s Aquaris. It features a 5.36-inch, 1920 x 1152 screen, an eight-core processor, 2 GB of RAM, and 16 GB of integrated flash storage. The rear camera boasts 20.7 megapixels, while the front one boasts 2 megapixels. The phone is built on the MediaTek MT6595 system-on-a-chip.

Meizu’s phone is for China (and Europe)

Canonical is pitching the Ubuntu MX4 phone at the Chinese market. Meizu is a Chinese smartphone manufacturer, after all. “The move kicks off Meizu’s push towards strengthening the Ubuntu ecosystem in China, ahead of launching the Chinese Edition to its user base later this year,” proclaims Canonical’s press release.

More than just aiming at a general Chinese market, the Ubuntu MX4 is initially pitched at developers. Scopes and web apps for popular Chinese services like Baidu, Weibo, Youku, and QQ are already available in the Ubuntu store. Canonical wants developers to submit their own scopes and web apps to the Ubuntu store, enhancing the platform ahead of a wider consumer release. Canonical is still pushing Ubuntu phone’s scopes-focused interface as a better alternative to the app-centric iOS, Android, and Windows phone platforms.

Canonical notes Meizu’s Ubuntu MX4 will also “be sold across Europe soon,” so it will provide a higher-end Ubuntu phone to European users and developers looking for something more powerful than Bq’s phone.

Want to stay up to date on Linux, BSD, Chrome OS, and the rest of the World Beyond Windows? Bookmark the World Beyond Windows column page or follow our RSS feed.

But what about the USA, and elsewhere?

So China and Europe now have Ubuntu phones available. But what about the USA?

Previously, OMG Ubuntu reported it had heard that Canonical signed an agreement with Meizu to let Meizu distribute these phones in China, and give Canonical the ability to sell them in Europe and the USA. That’s why many people expected the Meizu MX4 to be the first Ubuntu phone for the US market. Meizu still appears to distributing these phones in China, and Canonical still appears to be distributing them in Europe—but what about the USA?

We don’t know anything about when the USA will get a Ubuntu phone or what the device will be. OMG Ubuntu reports that Canonical will be announcing details of a forthcoming Ubuntu phone in June. Canonical will be partnering with a different smartphone manufacturer to create and release a new phone for the US market, according to the report. Unfortunately, we haven’t heard anything about phones for the rest of the world.

This forthcoming phone may be the same one that offers Ubuntu’s long-teased convergence features. After all, Canonical promised it would announce a new phone with smartphone-PC convergence features after Microsoft revealed its own smartphone-PC convergence plans with Windows 10 for phones.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2923931/the-meizu-x4-is-the-first-compelling-ubuntu-phone.html

Misplaced ire toward Ubuntu and Canonical is hurting Linux – TechRepublic

Mark Shuttleworth addressed the audience for the kickoff of the recent Ubuntu Online Summit. In typical Shuttleworth fashion, he issued a sort of call to arms in an effort to bring the open source community together as one. To that end, Shuttleworth said:

“So, I’m issuing a call to people who participate in every desktop environment…to folks who work on all desktop environments to set aside our differences, to recognize that the opportunity now is bigger than those differences, to create experiences that span phones and tablets and PCs, to bring all of our applications, none of which are on one desktop environment or another to everywhere.”

…and the people reacted. In fact, Aaron Seigo, a prominent figure in the world of KDE, called Shuttleworth out for:

“…creating schism after schism in the Linux desktop world, from Mir to Unity to making their own QML API from scratch and developing a mobile UX behind closed doors…”.

The court of public opinion against Shuttleworth is that he hopes to get the whole of the open source community to help bring his endgame for Ubuntu to realization. In the eyes of those against Canonical, Shuttleworth would want Ubuntu to rise to the top of all other platforms — even to the detriment of every Linux distribution available. All of this, because Canonical decided to develop its own tools.

To this, I respond with a trip back in time to when Red Hat decided to focus entirely on enterprise solutions and spin off Fedora as a community-edition desktop, followed by CentOS as a community-edition server. There was outrage. How could Red Hat turn its back on the open source community?

Fast forward a decade or so and check the pulse of Red Hat and what and how it’s doing now. Pretty well, I would say. Red Hat gives back to open source, and it has been a huge reason why Linux has made major inroads in the enterprise world.

Imagine, if you will, a world in which Red Hat didn’t change its trajectory and continued focusing on the community desktop/server world? More than likely, SUSE would have picked up the slack — or, would it have continued in the same manner as Red Hat and focused on the desktop?

Do you see where this leads?

Linux has been at this same crossroad for a very long time — a point where it will take a leadership willing to make the hard decisions in order to force Linux through a very thick (and brittle) ceiling. That’s what Canonical is attempting to do.

One simple goal: make the Linux desktop a household name. What Linux and open source fan doesn’t want that?

I’ve been crying out for this for years. Now, it seems, the call needs to be a little bit louder and a little bit prouder.

If we (the Linux and open source community) want Linux to succeed as a mass-market desktop option, one thing has to happen: Every member of the Linux/open source community needs to rally behind the Linux desktop distribution that has the best chance at making the leap into the homes and businesses of the masses. Considering all that Canonical has done to leverage Ubuntu as a commercially viable option, the choice should be obvious to everyone.

Only it’s not.

You see, there are a massive number of Linux fanboys and fangirls who are passionate about their distribution of choice. To each fan, their distribution of choice is the only logical solution to the age old Linux cry of “world domination.”

Only it’s probably not.

Nearly every Linux distribution has its pros and cons — some of those pros and cons are deal breakers and deal makers. And although my current desktop distribution is Ubuntu 15.04, I wouldn’t say it is the best desktop distribution available (that title could very soon belong to Elementary OS Freya).

However, as Microsoft has proved over and over and over and over, success isn’t always contingent on having the best platform. To become a success in today’s world, there are so many factors that must be considered. Canonical has, very clearly, rolled more of those factors into the creation of its brand than any other desktop Linux distribution.

That’s right, I said it — brand. That word is the key to a kingdom Linux has desperately wanted to rule for a very long time. Without brand, no Linux distribution will succeed to the level it needs.

Canonical gets that, and the company is doing everything it can to solidify that brand and make sure it’s consumer worthy. Since Canonical brought to life the idea of convergence, it was clear the company had a master plan. Yes, part of that plan was to build some crucial systems in-house (even when there were pre-existing options available), and this brought forth the vitriol of a number of members of a few communities (think Wayland).

The truth of the matter is, many distributions could re-focus their efforts toward building a brand that people will want. But, do they have the capacity to layer the serious business of re-branding over their development prowess? Are they willing to make unpopular decisions in the name of this rebranding?

My guess is no and no.

Ubuntu, Mint, Elementary, openSUSE, Mageia, and Debian are all strong enough candidates for the desktop platform of the masses. Of those distributions, only one has enough brand momentum to pull it off.

Ubuntu.

It may not be the best flavor of Linux. It may not be the most user friendly, open, or fan-favorite distribution. It is, however, the one distribution best poised for mass acceptance. But for that to happen, the entire Linux and open source community needs to get behind the effort. That does not mean, in any way, that we all need to turn our backs on our distribution of choice; it only means joining the effort to get the one flavor of Linux with the best chance at mass acceptance in front of the masses. Once that goal is accomplished, maybe that distribution you love so much will enjoy its deserved moment in the spotlight.

But as long as the Linux and open source community continue to fight among themselves, this will never happen. Without a convergent effort from the current user base, Linux will continue to hit the same ceiling that has held it down for years.

The moment is now. The Linux community must set aside their differences and rally behind the one desktop distribution that stands a chance at succeeding with the masses. Yes, there are differences within the camps, but are those battles worth fighting when the cost is so high?

Also read

Note: TechRepublic and ZDNet are CBS Interactive properties.

Article source: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/misplaced-ire-toward-ubuntu-and-canonical-is-hurting-linux/

Windows 10 vs Ubuntu – Which OS Will Be The First?

Buyers, especially tech enthusiasts are crazy about the latest tablets and phones that roll out, thus the sales for PCs are pretty low. In the near future, individuals may start using these devices as desktop PCs instead. A major blow for the computer companies might be on the verge of happening, thus a new design concerning the software may also be implemented. So, we can say goodbye to operation systems and apps with one sole UI. It would be awesome though to see how the apps we use change their format depending on how they are being used. This whole process was called convergence and was inspired by those who creating Ubuntu OS when they rolled out a mobile device that also worked as a computer back in 2013. And even though the campaign for this phone didn’t go as planned, those at Canonical were dedicated to implement big changes and make their Ubuntu operating system, into this versatile UI. And right behind them is the Microsoft Company, a strong competitor that also wishes to do the same thing with Windows 10. So it seems that the “convergence” battle is on and the question is: which one will stir the biggest wave?

Windows

Hardware Know-how: Since Microsoft purchased Nokia, this means it has the necessary tools to make all kinds of gadgets that can display the power of Windows 10.

Other features: Windows 10 is also planning on adding some amazing control commands that function both on desktop and mobile device. One of the leading cross-platforms apps out there is Cortana. Users can use it to plan their meetings, dates and look up necessary info. Microsoft also wishes to revamp the UI, so that it functions on a vast array of gadgets.

Even if Windows is not that big of a name concerning the mobile industry, it is the ultimate operating system for all home computers.  Microsoft’s major perk here is that it also implements other types of software such as the Office one. And because it has this kind of mastery, it is able to overhaul the Office with all kinds of universal applications.

Canonical however, doesn’t own the same type control and cannot further expand software on Ubuntu OS. The developers are famous for the LibreOffice software instead.

All set for iPhoneAndroid apps: During the Build expo, Microsoft made public its plans of leading the way for iPhone as well as Android apps to run on Windows 10.

Those working on this project can actually port iOS and Android apps to Windows 10 and writing those endless codes will not be required. So, by allowing all of these popular apps to roll in, Microsoft will grant users the chance of enjoying their favorite apps.

What about Ubuntu?

Ubuntu will be the first to arrive at the finish line and will offer users the first PC-phone OS. We are all exciting to get our hands on this new gizmo that also works as a desktop. Apparently, it will roll out in 2015.  Even if Microsoft is also rushing to launch its OS on computers and tablets in the following month, the launch date for the rest of the devices is still unknown.

Let’s talk costs: Ubuntu first came out with Aquarius E4.5. Even if some of the specifications of this phone might be a bit overwhelming for some, the fact that the price is a pretty low one, will tempt users to give it a go. Ubuntu wishes to bring the versatile OS to a new level. The fact that Ubuntu is considering the user’s needs and trying to overlook the online and offline content, reveals the fact that the latter has bigger plans than Windows.

There are plenty of open-sources that function on Windows, but Ubuntu has a different game plan in stored. It wishes to release free software that users can download from the Dash desktop.

Customization: Operating on Windows, means you’re pretty much cemented with the OS that the latter offers you. With Ubuntu, on the other hand, if you’re not pleased with something concerning the OS, you can easily make adjustments.


Article source: http://www.ordoh.com/2015/05/windows-10-ubuntu-os/

Dell Launches Cheap Ubuntu-Powered Inspiron 15 3000 Series

Dell is one of the most important providers of Ubuntu-powered hardware, and the company has just released a new laptop called Inspiron 15 3000 Series Laptop Ubuntu Edition.

Companies like Dell or IBM have helped to make Ubuntu much more popular because they sell a lot of hardware, and they are shipping that hardware with Ubuntu preinstalled. It might not seem like a big deal. After all, you can always install something else, but many customers don’t switch to a different OS and Ubuntu remains installed.

It also helps the fact that Dell, despite its big name, still has some very affordable laptop and netbooks. Because they ship with Ubuntu and not Windows the price of the device is lower, making these versions a very good choice.

Inspiron 15 3000 is not a powerhouse

There is a very good reason Inspiron 15 3000 is a rather cheap laptop. The price starts at $250 (€224), but it goes up when you change the hardware configuration. If you just need something for office and Internet browsing, you won’t be disappointed by the results.

The cheapest configuration features an Intel Celeron® Processor (Dual Core), 4GB of RAM, and 500GB HDD. On the other side of the spectrum, we have Intel Pentium Processor (Quad Core), 4GB RAM, 500GB HDD, and two years of warranty (instead of one). This version costs $350 (€313). It’s also worth mentioning that all versions come with a 15.6-inch HD (1366 x 768) Truelife LED-Backlit display.

“Get exactly what you want with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, the popular OS including Google Chrome browser, five years of free security and maintenance updates. The Dell Inspiron 15 3000 Series Laptop is equipped with the latest processors from Intel, with responsive performance for all your tasks from surfing the web, writing a term paper, editing video or doing web chats,” reads the official website.

More details about the Inspiron 15 3000 series can be found on the website.

Article source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/Dell-Launches-Cheap-Ubuntu-Powered-Inspiron-15-3000-Series-481873.shtml

‘Bag snatchers’ feel ubuntu wrath

INDEPENDENT MEDIA
Two men were left bloodied and bruised after snatching a womans handbag as she headed for the Bree Street taxi rank. File Photo: Wesley Fester

Johannesburg – A man sat on the pavement in Newtown, blood bubbling in his nose. Flies sat on the blood caked on his head, as he avoided the gaze of the jeering crowd.

His accomplice lay on his belly about two steps from him, also uncuffed, with both hands covering his face.

The circle of people around them grew as more stopped to ask: “What did they do?” to other bystanders, but not to the Joburg Metro Police Department officers parked nearby.

At about 3pm on Wednesday, the two had tried to snatch a woman’s bag as she headed for the Bree Street taxi rank.

She cried out for help and Xolani Mthembu did not stop to think how far his smart shoes would carry him, or how his shirt would constrict him. He just lept into action.

“I was walking to my car and heard her screaming. I ran towards the robbers and my brother followed me,” he said.

Two taxi drivers noticed the commotion and stopped their vehicles to join the chase. “They caught the one guy and I caught the other. He tried to snap away, but I kicked him and trapped him.”

The businessman said the young bag-owner cried tears of gratitude when he returned her possession.

People laughed and pointed at the thwarted alleged thieves. “They’re lucky the police came so soon,” said one onlooker, sneering. “We would’ve dragged them behind a car”.

As one of the suspects sat up, his eye swollen shut, Mthembu added: “We like to keep our town as safe as possible.”

lerato.mbangeni@inl.co.za

The Star

Article source: http://www.iol.co.za/news/crime-courts/bag-snatchers-feel-ubuntu-wrath-1.1861672

Misplaced ire toward Ubuntu and Canonical is hurting Linux

Mark Shuttleworth addressed the audience for the kickoff of the recent Ubuntu Online Summit. In typical Shuttleworth fashion, he issued a sort of call to arms in an effort to bring the open source community together as one. To that end, Shuttleworth said:

“So, I’m issuing a call to people who participate in every desktop environment…to folks who work on all desktop environments to set aside our differences, to recognize that the opportunity now is bigger than those differences, to create experiences that span phones and tablets and PCs, to bring all of our applications, none of which are on one desktop environment or another to everywhere.”

…and the people reacted. In fact, Aaron Seigo, a prominent figure in the world of KDE, called Shuttleworth out for:

“…creating schism after schism in the Linux desktop world, from Mir to Unity to making their own QML API from scratch and developing a mobile UX behind closed doors…”.

The court of public opinion against Shuttleworth is that he hopes to get the whole of the open source community to help bring his endgame for Ubuntu to realization. In the eyes of those against Canonical, Shuttleworth would want Ubuntu to rise to the top of all other platforms — even to the detriment of every Linux distribution available. All of this, because Canonical decided to develop its own tools.

To this, I respond with a trip back in time to when Red Hat decided to focus entirely on enterprise solutions and spin off Fedora as a community-edition desktop, followed by CentOS as a community-edition server. There was outrage. How could Red Hat turn its back on the open source community?

Fast forward a decade or so and check the pulse of Red Hat and what and how it’s doing now. Pretty well, I would say. Red Hat gives back to open source, and it has been a huge reason why Linux has made major inroads in the enterprise world.

Imagine, if you will, a world in which Red Hat didn’t change its trajectory and continued focusing on the community desktop/server world? More than likely, SUSE would have picked up the slack — or, would it have continued in the same manner as Red Hat and focused on the desktop?

Do you see where this leads?

Linux has been at this same crossroad for a very long time — a point where it will take a leadership willing to make the hard decisions in order to force Linux through a very thick (and brittle) ceiling. That’s what Canonical is attempting to do.

One simple goal: make the Linux desktop a household name. What Linux and open source fan doesn’t want that?

I’ve been crying out for this for years. Now, it seems, the call needs to be a little bit louder and a little bit prouder.

If we (the Linux and open source community) want Linux to succeed as a mass-market desktop option, one thing has to happen: Every member of the Linux/open source community needs to rally behind the Linux desktop distribution that has the best chance at making the leap into the homes and businesses of the masses. Considering all that Canonical has done to leverage Ubuntu as a commercially viable option, the choice should be obvious to everyone.

Only it’s not.

You see, there are a massive number of Linux fanboys and fangirls who are passionate about their distribution of choice. To each fan, their distribution of choice is the only logical solution to the age old Linux cry of “world domination.”

Only it’s probably not.

Nearly every Linux distribution has its pros and cons — some of those pros and cons are deal breakers and deal makers. And although my current desktop distribution is Ubuntu 15.04, I wouldn’t say it is the best desktop distribution available (that title could very soon belong to Elementary OS Freya).

However, as Microsoft has proved over and over and over and over, success isn’t always contingent on having the best platform. To become a success in today’s world, there are so many factors that must be considered. Canonical has, very clearly, rolled more of those factors into the creation of its brand than any other desktop Linux distribution.

That’s right, I said it — brand. That word is the key to a kingdom Linux has desperately wanted to rule for a very long time. Without brand, no Linux distribution will succeed to the level it needs.

Canonical gets that, and the company is doing everything it can to solidify that brand and make sure it’s consumer worthy. Since Canonical brought to life the idea of convergence, it was clear the company had a master plan. Yes, part of that plan was to build some crucial systems in-house (even when there were pre-existing options available), and this brought forth the vitriol of a number of members of a few communities (think Wayland).

The truth of the matter is, many distributions could re-focus their efforts toward building a brand that people will want. But, do they have the capacity to layer the serious business of re-branding over their development prowess? Are they willing to make unpopular decisions in the name of this rebranding?

My guess is no and no.

Ubuntu, Mint, Elementary, openSUSE, Mageia, and Debian are all strong enough candidates for the desktop platform of the masses. Of those distributions, only one has enough brand momentum to pull it off.

Ubuntu.

It may not be the best flavor of Linux. It may not be the most user friendly, open, or fan-favorite distribution. It is, however, the one distribution best poised for mass acceptance. But for that to happen, the entire Linux and open source community needs to get behind the effort. That does not mean, in any way, that we all need to turn our backs on our distribution of choice; it only means joining the effort to get the one flavor of Linux with the best chance at mass acceptance in front of the masses. Once that goal is accomplished, maybe that distribution you love so much will enjoy its deserved moment in the spotlight.

But as long as the Linux and open source community continue to fight among themselves, this will never happen. Without a convergent effort from the current user base, Linux will continue to hit the same ceiling that has held it down for years.

The moment is now. The Linux community must set aside their differences and rally behind the one desktop distribution that stands a chance at succeeding with the masses. Yes, there are differences within the camps, but are those battles worth fighting when the cost is so high?

Also read

Note: TechRepublic and ZDNet are CBS Interactive properties.

Article source: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/misplaced-ire-toward-ubuntu-and-canonical-is-hurting-linux/

LFA (Linux For ALL) Distro Is Now Based on Ubuntu 15.04 and Debian 8 Jessie

Arne Exton, the creator of several distributions of GNU/Linux and Android-x86 Live CDs, has recently updated his LFA (Linux For ALL) distribution with a new, custom kernel package and various under-the-hood improvements.

Probably the most important feature of the new LFA (Linux For ALL) build is that it’s now based on the recently released Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) and Debian GNU/Linux 8.0 (Jessie) operating systems. “LFA (Linux for all) is based on Ubuntu 15.04, codenamed ‘Vivid Vervet’ and Debian ‘Jessie’ (Debian 8). It’s a total rebuild. I.e. nothing is left of the old LFA system,” says Arne Exton.

Another interesting feature that has been implemented by Arne Exton in the new build of his LFA (Linux For ALL) distribution is “Copy to RAM,” which means that users will be able to run the Live CD entirely from RAM (system’s memory), ejecting the bootable medium. However, for the new “Copy to RAM” feature to work, users will need to have a computer with at least 2GB of RAM.

Additionally, the custom kernel package has been updated in LFA (Linux For ALL) from version 3.19.0-5-exton to version 3.19.0-14-exton, and the Live DVD ISO image has gained ISO-hybrid capabilities, which means that you can either burn it onto a DVD disc with any CD/DVD burning software or write it on a USB flash drive with Unetbootin, GNOME Disks, or a similar app. It is recommended to use a USB stick because it allows you to save system settings and continue the live session at a later time.

The distribution now uses only the Fluxbox window manager

Now for the not-so-good news, we can report that LFA (Linux For ALL) now uses a single desktop environment, which is built around the Fluxbox window manager. Previous versions of LFA (Linux For ALL) use no less than four desktop environment, namely Unity, LXDE, Razor-qt, and XBMC.

However, the Fluxbox-based desktop is highly customized with a dock (application launcher) and various other tweaks that make it both fast and modern. Download LFA (Linux For ALL) 15.04 build 150513 right now from Softpedia.

Article source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/LFA-Linux-For-ALL-Distro-Is-Now-Based-on-Ubuntu-15-04-and-Debian-8-Jessie-481829.shtml

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to Land on October 22

The release schedule for Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) has been finalized, and we now have all the intermediary steps and the launch date for the next operating system from Canonical.

One of the reasons Ubuntu is so popular is the fact that a new version arrives every six months, like clockwork. It might not seem like a big deal, but it is. It’s very hard to give a precise date for a launch, especially when it’s an operating system. It means that developers usually have less than six months to make all changes they want and need.

At the beginning of a new Ubuntu cycle, the OS brings all the latest packages from the Debian testing branch and the work starts, almost immediately after the previous launch. It takes at least a couple of months to see any major differences, although it’s quite likely that nothing out of the ordinary will be implemented in all this time. The Ubuntu development is done with small little steps, not with big leaps. Each new release might seem a little boring when compared with the previous version, but it should be compared with something released two years back, and the differences will be more than obvious.

Ubuntu 15.10 to land on October 22

In case you didn’t already know, Ubuntu version numbers are actually indicative of the launch date. For example, Ubuntu 15.10 means that the system will be launched in 2015, in October (the tenth month). Ubuntu 16.04 means that it will be released in 2016, in April.

The preliminary release for Ubuntu 15.10 has been published for a week now, but the devs needed to know if something could have gotten in the way of their releases, like conferences or other events. From the looks of it, the schedule hasn’t changed, and Ubuntu 15.10 will arrive on October 22.

Ubuntu no longer has intermediate releases, with just one exception

There are many different Ubuntu flavors, and they each do their own thing. Some of them still follow the regular releases, with Alphas and Betas, others don’t. Ubuntu has a single Beta release near the end of the cycle.

The first Alpha version for Ubuntu flavors will land on June 25, the second Alpha on July 30, and the first Beta should be ready on August 27. The last Beta in the series, which will also include the officially flavor, will land on September 24.

Enjoy!

Article source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/Ubuntu-15-10-Wily-Werewolf-to-Land-on-October-22-481846.shtml

The Meizu X4 is the first compelling Ubuntu phone

We’ve been hearing about Meizu’s forthcoming Ubuntu-powered smartphone since early 2014—more than a year ago. Well, all those words just became tangible, and they’ve coalesced into the first compelling-looking Ubuntu phone.

The Ubuntu MX4 is now out and can be purchased from Meizu’s website in China. Meizu’s Ubuntu phone follows in the footsteps of the Bq Aquaris, which is now on sale across Europe. The second Ubuntu smartphone will also be on sale in Europe soon.

Let’s dig into the specs first. Meizu’s MX4 Ubuntu edition is a higher-end phone than Bq’s Aquaris. It features a 5.36-inch, 1920 x 1152 screen, an eight-core processor, 2 GB of RAM, and 16 GB of integrated flash storage. The rear camera boasts 20.7 megapixels, while the front one boasts 2 megapixels. The phone is built on the MediaTek MT6595 system-on-a-chip.

Meizu’s phone is for China (and Europe)

Canonical is pitching the Ubuntu MX4 phone at the Chinese market. Meizu is a Chinese smartphone manufacturer, after all. “The move kicks off Meizu’s push towards strengthening the Ubuntu ecosystem in China, ahead of launching the Chinese Edition to its user base later this year,” proclaims Canonical’s press release.

More than just aiming at a general Chinese market, the Ubuntu MX4 is initially pitched at developers. Scopes and web apps for popular Chinese services like Baidu, Weibo, Youku, and QQ are already available in the Ubuntu store. Canonical wants developers to submit their own scopes and web apps to the Ubuntu store, enhancing the platform ahead of a wider consumer release. Canonical is still pushing Ubuntu phone’s scopes-focused interface as a better alternative to the app-centric iOS, Android, and Windows phone platforms.

Canonical notes Meizu’s Ubuntu MX4 will also “be sold across Europe soon,” so it will provide a higher-end Ubuntu phone to European users and developers looking for something more powerful than Bq’s phone.

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But what about the USA, and elsewhere?

So China and Europe now have Ubuntu phones available. But what about the USA?

Previously, OMG Ubuntu reported it had heard that Canonical signed an agreement with Meizu to let Meizu distribute these phones in China, and give Canonical the ability to sell them in Europe and the USA. That’s why many people expected the Meizu MX4 to be the first Ubuntu phone for the US market. Meizu still appears to distributing these phones in China, and Canonical still appears to be distributing them in Europe—but what about the USA?

We don’t know anything about when the USA will get a Ubuntu phone or what the device will be. OMG Ubuntu reports that Canonical will be announcing details of a forthcoming Ubuntu phone in June. Canonical will be partnering with a different smartphone manufacturer to create and release a new phone for the US market, according to the report. Unfortunately, we haven’t heard anything about phones for the rest of the world.

This forthcoming phone may be the same one that offers Ubuntu’s long-teased convergence features. After all, Canonical promised it would announce a new phone with smartphone-PC convergence features after Microsoft revealed its own smartphone-PC convergence plans with Windows 10 for phones.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2923931/the-meizu-x4-is-the-first-compelling-ubuntu-phone.html