Dell Unveils New High-End Ubuntu Linux Laptop

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Dell’s Project Sputnik has released a Precision M3800 laptop running Canonical’s Ubuntu 14.04 open source Linux operating system.

If you’re a developer and like Ubuntu Linux, your coffee may taste sweeter this morning. Dell has unveiled a new Precision M3800 laptop preloaded with the open source operating system and tailored for programmers and high-end applications.

The device is the latest offering to issue from Dell’s Project Sputnik, an initiative to create Ubuntu-powered laptops and additional software tools designed for developers. Project Sputnik launched in 2012 and rolled out its first device, based on the XPS 13 laptop, that December in the United States market. Dell extended the offering to Europe in early 2013.

Project Sputnik had been mostly quiet since that time. That changed this week with the announcement of the Precision M3800 Ubuntu laptop, which boasts even more hardware power than its XPS 13 predecessor. The device sports an Intel fourth-generation i7 CPU, NVIDIA Quadro K1100M graphics, up to 16GB of memory and a 4K Ultra HD screen option, featuring 3840×2160 resolution. (The default resolution is 1920×1080.)

My trusty i5, 4GB laptop is tired just thinking about this latest Linux laptop from Dell.

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Of course, specs like these don’t come cheap. Pricing for the newest Project Sputnik laptop, which runs Ubuntu version 14.04, the latest long-term support release of Canonical‘s operating system, starts at $1,533.50. (Opponents of the “Windows Tax” will be happy to know that that’s $101.50 less than the Windows model with the same hardware configuration.) The laptop will be available worldwide, according to Dell.

For a high-end laptop that is also very portable, that’s not a bad price. And given that this is one of the only Linux-based laptops available from a major PC and laptop manufacturer, it will come as a welcome offering for many open source fans.

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Article source: http://thevarguy.com/ubuntu/012815/dell-unveils-new-high-end-ubuntu-linux-laptop

Dell offers new Ubuntu Linux workstation laptop

In 2007, Dell became the first major computer OEM to sell pre-installed Linux on their computers. Today, Dell continues to support desktop Linux. In its latest move, Dell will be bringing Ubuntu 14.04 to its top-of-the-line Precision M3800 workstation laptop and the latest model of the Dell XPS 13 .

dell-precision-m3800.jpg
Dell’s top-of-the-line Precision M3800 workstation laptop is available with Ubuntu Linux 14.04.

Both systems will be running Ubuntu 14.04 SP1. This is the long-term support (LTS) version of Ubuntu. It will be supported by Ubuntu‘s parent company Canonical for five years after its release: April 2019.

According to Barton George, Dell’s Director of Developer Programs, in a blog posting, programmers had been asking for a bigger, better officially supported Ubuntu Linux developer laptop and that’s the Precision M3800 . This came about from a combination of the efforts of Dell software engineer Jared Dominguez and enthusiastic user support.

Ubuntu 14.04: Smoother than earlier versions (Gallery)

George stated that the Ubuntu-powered Precision M3800 developer edition’s key features are:

  • Preloaded Ubuntu 14.04 LTS
  • Next generation of the world’s thinnest and lightest true 15-inch mobile workstation
  • Starting weight of just 4.15lbs (1.88kg) and a form factor that is less than 0.71 inches (18mm) thick
  • Fourth generation Intel Core i7 quad-core processor, professional grade NVIDIA Quadro K1100M graphics, and up to 16GB of memory
  • 4K Ultra HD (3840×2160) screen option
  • Availability: worldwide

That’s the good news. The bad news is, as Dominguez explained on his blog, this version of the M3800 doesn’t support its built-in Thunderbolt 2 port out of the box. Dominguez wrote,

Because our Ubuntu factory installs only ship Ubuntu LTS releases, we were not able to ship with official Thunderbolt support. However, thanks to the hardware-enablement stack in Ubuntu, starting with upcoming Ubuntu 14.04.2, you will be able to upgrade your kernel to add some Thunderbolt support. We plan to be working with Canonical to re-certify the Precision M3800 with official Thunderbolt support.

Sound good to you? To get the M3800 developer edition, go to the Dell Precision M3800 Mobile Workstation page and choose the system labeled “Fully Customizable” on the far left. The next Ubuntu-powered XPS 13 isn’t available yet, when it is, it will list for approximately $50 less than the corresponding windows configuration.

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Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/article/dell-offers-new-ubuntu-linux-workstation-laptop/

For Brands With a gTLD, It’s Time to Rethink Your SEO Strategy

Owning your own generic top-level domain (gTLD) means it’s important to rethink your SEO strategy, as gTLDs will ultimately change how people search and navigate the Internet.

Search engine optimization (SEO) is always evolving in response to changes in user behavior and the algorithms that users rely upon to find their way around the Internet. Apps and social media have also become dominant players into SEO strategy as we learn how users interact with our brands via mobile devices and within social networks.

For brands who own their own gTLD (generic top-level domain), also known as a dot brand, it’s time to really rethink your whole SEO strategy. This is not just because gTLDs will ultimately change how people search and navigate the Internet, but also because brands have a whole new blank slate and a platform to create something that’s better than what you had before. Consider, for example, if American Express promoted Travel.Amex instead of one of the many live sites we found: [www.americanexpress.com/travel/home], [www.amexglobalbusinesstravel.com], [www.222.295.americanexpress.com/travel-insurance.home], [www.americanexpresstravelresources.com], or the many other variations of live Web pages out there that appear to be American Express travel pages. Which ones are real or not is sometimes hard to tell. Not only is Travel.Amex easy to remember, so much so that a user might just type it into the browser, but it’s also clearly authentically the real American Express, which will give it a boost in organic search.

Brand TLDs Signal the Algorithm That It’s Legitimate

The number one most important factor for brands with gTLDs to consider is that if they build out a website or digital space in their new top-level domain, the top-level domain becomes a signal to the algorithm that it’s legitimate, authentic, and actually that brand. Whether it’s a financial institution like Dot JPMorgan or a retailer like Dot Macys, the top-level domain is completely owned by the brand, meaning only they can issue domain names in their space, assuring authenticity. For car dealers, that means having a Dot BMW address could translate into real economic value.

Take a look at what Matt Cutts of Google has said: “There will be a transition period where we have to learn or find out different ways of what the valid TLDs are and if there is any way we can find out what the domains on that top-level domain are. It’s definitely been that case that we always wanted to return the best results to users and so we try to figure that out whether it’s on a .com, .de, or .whatever.”

Once the algorithm learns that a brand TLD is valid, to use Matt Cutts’ word, then it will recognize everything to the left of that as valid. It becomes a signal. This is exactly what happened when Dot CO went from meaning a country code to meaning Company. “There have been enough people using Dot CO (the country code TLD for Columbia) around the world, that we are not treating it as if it is specific to Columbia,” said Cutts.

This is really huge for brands with a TLD because it means they can rethink everything about SEO strategy and really start to consider how they build out new spaces to generate better results with a powerful new tool – their Dot Brand.

Combine the TLD With Content Strategies – a Winning Formula

Consider other algorithm changes in the last 10 years. It has spurred a movement toward microsites or more narrowly defined and tailored information related to what the searcher is seeking. If your microsite is tailored to a specific user and experience with good quality content, then it is likely to perform better in organic search.

Combine these two high-level SEO strategies and you have a winning formula. If you’re a brand, having a digital address in your own branded space not only signals to the consumer that it’s legitimate and authentic or more secure, but it signals to the algorithm the same message. If your website is then messaged properly to what the searcher is seeking with good quality content, then all the pieces should come together for you.

Beyond the Dot Brand space, a similar strategy can apply. The new gTLDs will start to create categories on the Internet. If your digital space is about dogs and in .dogs or about bikes and in .bike, then that should help. If it’s not, however, then you could be penalized for being off message.

Redirecting Could Be a Mistake

Dot Brands are also facing a key SEO question: do they redirect domain names from their new TLD to their existing .com pages or vice versa? Based upon my team’s research, we recommend to build new digital addresses and spaces instead of redirecting. If you are going to redirect, though, we have a few tips.

Use 301 redirects from your existing space to the new TLD because this shows search engines that you are permanently moving from one domain to another. A 302 redirect is a signal that you are temporarily moving from one domain to another. If you are redirecting into a new gTLD, use a 301 redirect because 302 redirects can sometimes be ignored by certain search engines. Additionally, new gTLDs are not yet widely understood and redirecting on a temporary basis early will likely have a negative impact on the usability of your website. When new gTLDs are understood by algorithms, they will be ranked higher because they are 100 percent authentic and labeled as Not Spam. Redirecting early instead of building out new spaces may minimize this benefit. When you do decide to redirect, do it slowly and strategically. Start with one section of the website at a time and measure results as you go. Ultimately, you will want your digital world in your TLD so redirecting without a clear plan will backfire. While many will likely debate the results of search in new gTLDs until the tipping point is reached, brands with gTLDs can stop and re-assess if their SEO strategy is on target and leverage one of their most powerful digital assets – a platform at the root zone of the Internet.

Article source: http://www.clickz.com/clickz/column/2392086/for-brands-with-a-gtld-it-s-time-to-rethink-your-seo-strategy

GHOST Flaw Spooks Web Servers Worldwide

A newly disclosed flaw opens up most Linux-based Web and mail servers to attack, researchers from Redwood Shores, California-based security firm Qualys disclosed today (Jan. 27).

The flaw, dubbed “GHOST” by its discoverers, “allows attackers to remotely take complete control of the victim system without having any prior knowledge of system credentials,” (i.e. administrative passwords), Qualys staffer Amol Sarwate said in a company blog posting.

“As a proof of concept, we developed a full-fledged remote exploit against the Exim mail server, bypassing all existing protections (ASLR, PIE, and NX) on both 32-bit and 64-bit machines,” Qualys researchers posted on the Openwall security mailing list earlier today.

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GHOST is of immediate and urgent concern to any IT professional administering a Linux-based server, but users of desktop Linux should also install patches, which have already been pushed out by Red Hat and Ubuntu, among others. (Red Hat Fedora 20 and later, and Ubuntu 13.10 and later, were already immune.)

Various flavors of Linux power at least a third of the world’s Web servers and mail servers, but it’s likely that administrators at top Web-based companies were tipped off ahead of today’s disclosure.

GHOST Flaw Spooks Web Servers Worldwide

GHOST, designated CVE-2015-0235 per security-industry convention, is the fourth major vulnerability in open-source software found in the past 10 months. The stampede began with the discovery of the Heartbleed flaw in OpenSSL in April, then continued with the Shellshock hole in the Bash command-line shell in September, followed by the POODLE weakness in Web encryption in October.

Such technical talk may be gobbledygook to most computer users, but arcane open-source software runs the Internet and the Web that rides on top of it. Any major open-source flaw threatens not only the massive global Internet economy, but your ability to check your own Facebook page.

“To be clear, this is NOT the end of the Internet,” wrote Jen Ellis of Boston information-security firm Rapid7 in an official blog posting. “It’s also not another Heartbleed. But it is potentially nasty, and you should patch and reboot your affected systems immediately.”

The flaw exists in older versions of the GNU C library, or glibc, a repository of open-source software written in the C and C++ coding languages. Newer versions of glibc, beginning with glibc 2.18, released in August 2013, are not affected. But many builds of Linux may still be using older versions.

In addition to Exim, server software vulnerable to GHOST includes Apache, Exim, Sendmail, Nginx, MySQL, CUPS, Samba and many others, according to a post by Qualys researchers on the Full Disclosure mailing list.

The risk to users of massively subscribed services such as Twitter, Facebook and all of Google’s online services should be low, presuming that administrators of those company’s servers have already implemented or are currently implementing patches. (It’s possible that last night’s 40-minute Facebook outage was the result of this.)

But implementation of the patches will have to be manual, which means that millions of websites and mail servers that don’t get the same degree of administrative attention will continue to be vulnerable for an extended period of time.

Qualys will not release the exact details of its exploit right away, but look forward to seeing pranksters such as Lizard Squad try to use GHOST to deface websites in the coming weeks.

Paul Wagenseil is a senior editor at Tom’s Guide focused on security and gaming. Follow him at @snd_wagenseilFollow Tom’s Guide at @tomsguide, on Facebook and on Google+.

Copyright 2015 Toms Guides , a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/ghost-flaw-spooks-servers-worldwide-134519919.html

Ghost Linux bug haunting Red Hat and Ubuntu systems

An exploitable bug, codenamed Ghost, that affects numerous Linux systems has been discovered by researchers at Qualys.

Amol Sarwate, director of Qualys’ Vulnerability Labs, said in a threat advisory that the Ghost bug could be used to hijack control of a victim’s system.

“The Ghost (CVE-2015-0235) vulnerability is a serious weakness in the Linux glibc library. It allows attackers to remotely take complete control of the victim system without having any prior knowledge of system credentials,” read the advisory.

Ghost relates to a flaw in the GNU C Library (glibc) used in many Linux versions and affects several implementations of the operating system.

“The first vulnerable version of the GNU C Library affected by this is glibc-2.2, released on 10 November 2000,” explained Sarwate.

“We identified a number of factors that mitigate the impact of this bug. In particular, we discovered that it was fixed on 21 May 2013.

“Unfortunately, it was not recognised as a security threat; as a result, most stable and long-term support distributions were left exposed, including Debian 7 (wheezy), Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7, CentOS 6 and 7, and Ubuntu 12.04, for example.”

Qualys is working with Linux providers to make patches available on all versions. It is currently unclear whether Ghost is being actively exploited, although Qualys believes that hackers could bypass many traditional defences.

“During our testing, we developed a proof-of-concept in which we send a specially created email to a mail server and can get a remote shell to the Linux machine,” read the advisory.

“This bypasses all existing protections (like ASLR, PIE and NX) on both 32-bit and 64-bit systems.”

Other members of the security community seem less concerned about the Ghost bug. Pawan Kinger, director of Trend Micro’s Deep Security Labs, said in a blog post that there are three key reasons why hackers are unlikely to take notice of Ghost.

“This vulnerability has long been patched. The underlying problem was first introduced into glibc in 2000, but was fixed by May 2013. This means that many newer Linux operating systems were never at risk,” he said.

“Secondly, not all applications are at equal risk. Exploitation is very difficult as an attacker only has a small amount of initial exploit code that can be used: four or eight bytes.

“Third, the functions that are the subject of this vulnerability are obsolete. They cannot be used to translate domain names to IPv6 addresses; newer applications use the getaddrinfo() function, which does have IPv6 support.”

Rapid7 chief research officer H D Moore agreed. “This is not the end of the internet as we know it, nor is it another Heartbleed. In a general sense, it’s not likely to be an easy bug to exploit,” he said.

“Still, it could potentially be nasty if exploited so we strongly recommend immediate patching and rebooting. Without a reboot, services using the old library will not be restarted.”

Ghost follows the recent discovery of several dangerous cyber threats. Trend Micro engineers reported uncovering evolved versions of the kjw0rm and Sir DoOoM malware being developed on a bogus computer enthusiast site earlier in January.

Article source: http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2392369/ghost-linux-bug-haunting-red-hat-and-ubuntu-systems

Ubuntu Touch apps can run in windowed mode

The developers of the Ubuntu Linux operating system for desktop, notebook, and server computers are working on a touch-friendly version for smartphones and tablets, with the first Ubuntu phones expected to go on sale this year.

While Ubuntu for phones and tablets shares a lot of code with the version you would run on a laptop, apps designed for Ubuntu phones typically run in full-screen mode, much like Android or iOS apps.

But developer Michael Zanetti has written a blog post explaining how to run apps in resizeable windows that can be re-positioned.

ubuntu touch windowed_02

You can find instructions for installing Ubuntu on phones and tablets at the Ubuntu Wiki. There’s currently official support for the Google Nexus 4, the Nexus 7 2013 WiFi, and the Nexus 10, but there’s also unofficial support for a large number of other devices.

In order to try windowed mode, you’ll need to install a devel-proposed channel build of the newest version of Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet with the Unity8 desktop. Then you’ll need to follow Zenetti’s instructions for enabling support for windowed usage mode.

Once that’s done you’ll be able to drag windows around, shrink, maximize, or minimize apps, and generally treat mobile apps as if they were desktop apps… for the most part.

Zanetti says this works better on tablets than phones, since the panels for windows is hidden by the panel. He suggests starting the gallery app as a workaround.

ubuntu touch windowed

Windowed mode is still a work in progress and it may be disabled for devices with phone-sized screens in the future.

via Softpedia

Article source: http://liliputing.com/2015/01/ubuntu-touch-apps-can-run-windowed-mode.html

BOO! Grave remote-code exec flaw in GNU C Library TERRIFIES Linux

Security researchers have uncovered a critical bug in the GNU C Library (glibc), a key component of Linux and some other operating systems, which could render countless machines vulnerable to remote code execution attacks.

The flaw, which was discovered by Qualys and assigned CVE-2015-0235, is known as the GHOST vulnerability because it can be triggered by the library’s gethostbyname family of functions.

An attacker who successfully exploits the flaw can potentially gain complete control over an affected machine without any prior knowledge of system logins or passwords.

The exploit doesn’t attack the library directly. Rather, because so much software relies on the functions found in glibc, any number of programs running on affected machines could potentially be vulnerable.

The problem lies in the glibc code leading up to this C statement:

resbuf-h_name = strcpy (hostname, name);

strcpy() is dangerous and an obvious target in an audit because it blindly copies the entire contents of a zero-terminated buffer into another memory buffer without checking the size of the target buffer. name can end up containing more bytes than hostname expects to hold, allowing a heap overflow to occur. This, according to Qualys, can be exploited to achieve code execution despite malloc hardening to protect against heap attacks, and no-execute defenses in the CPU to stop unexpected execution of instructions.

The specific exploit disclosed by Qualys can be used against the Exim mail server, which is the default mail transfer agent on Debian Linux systems.

“During our testing, we developed a proof-of-concept in which we send a specially created e-mail to a mail server and can get a remote shell to the Linux machine,” Qualys CTO Wolfgang Kandek wrote in a blog post on Tuesday. “This bypasses all existing protections (like ASLR, PIE and NX) on both 32-bit and 64-bit systems.”

The vulnerability affects versions of glibc as far back as glibc-2.2, which was released in 2000.

Qualys posted complete details of the flaw on Tuesday, including snippets of code from applications that make use of the affected library routines, but only after working closely with several Linux vendors to patch the bug and offer a coordinated response.

Fixes for affected systems are already available from Debian, Red Hat, and Ubuntu.

According to Qualys, GHOST is not as widespread as it could be. The buggy routines in question are outdated and are no longer used by much software. Where they are used, they typically aren’t called in a way meets the criteria for the exploit.

Qualys says it has tested a number of other applications and servers that make use of the affected functions and has determined that they are not vulnerable, including apache, cups, dovecot, gnupg, isc-dhcp, lighttpd, mariadb/mysql, nfs-utils, nginx, nodejs, openldap, openssh, postfix, proftpd, pure-ftpd, rsyslog, samba, sendmail, sysklogd, syslog-ng, tcp_wrappers, vsftpd, and xinetd.

What’s more, patches that mend the flaw have actually been available since May 2013. Because they were not marked as security fixes, however, they weren’t incorporated into stable and long-term support versions of several distros. Among the affected versions are CentOS 6 and 7, Debian 7 (“wheezy”), Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

Qualys says the routines are definitely exploitable and that it has already developed proof-of-concept exploit code, which will soon be incorporated into a Metasploit plugin. But it’s holding off on making the attack code public, it says, until the vulnerability is no longer an immediate threat.

“We want to give everyone enough time to patch,” Qualys said. “According to our data once the vulnerability has reached its half-life we will release the exploit. Half-life is the time interval measuring a reduction of a vulnerability’s occurrence by half. Over time, this metric shows how successful efforts have been to eradicate vulnerability.” ®

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Article source: http://go.theregister.com/feed/www.theregister.co.uk/2015/01/27/glibc_ghost_vulnerability/

GHOST, a critical Linux security hole, is revealed

Researchers at cloud security company Qualys have discovered a major security hole, GHOST (CVE-2015-0235), in the Linux GNU C Library (glibc). This vulnerability enables hackers to remotely take control of systems without even knowing any system IDs or passwords.

Qualys alerted the major Linux distributors about the security hole quickly and most have now released patches for it. Josh Bressers, manager of the Red Hat product security team said in an interview that, “Red Hat got word of this about a week ago. Updates to fix GHOST on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5, 6, and 7 are now available via the Red Hat Network.”

This hole exists in any Linux system that was built with glibc-2.2, which was released on November 10, 2000. Qualys found that the bug had actually been patched with a minor bug fix released on May 21, 2013 between the releases of glibc-2.17 and glibc-2.18.

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However, this fix was not classified as a security problem, and as a result, many stable and long-term-support distributions are wide open today. Linux systems that are liable to attack include Debian 7 (Wheezy), RHEL 5, 6, and 7, CentOS 6 and 7 and Ubuntu 12.04. Besides Red Hat’s fix, Debian is currently repairing its core distributions, Ubuntu has patched the bug both for 12.04 and the older 10.04, and I’m told the patches are on their way for CentOS.

The security hole can be triggered by exploiting glibc’s gethostbyname functions. This function is used on almost all networked Linux computers when the computer is called on to access another networked computer either by using the /etc/hosts files or, more commonly, by resolving an Internet domain name with Domain Name System (DNS).

To exploit this vulnerability, all an attacker needs to do is trigger a buffer overflow by using an invalid hostname argument to an application that performs a DNS resolution. This vulnerability then enables a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the user running DNS. In short, once an attacker has exploited GHOST they may be capable of taking over the system.

“GHOST poses a remote code execution risk that makes it incredibly easy for an attacker to exploit a machine. For example, an attacker could send a simple email on a Linux-based system and automatically get complete access to that machine,” said Wolfgang Kandek, Qualys’s CTO in a statement. “Given the sheer number of systems based on glibc, we believe this is a high severity vulnerability and should be addressed immediately. The best course of action to mitigate the risk is to apply a patch from your Linux vendor.”

Unlike some security announcements, Kandek is not crying wolf. Qualys has developed a proof-of-concept in which simply sending a specially created e-mail to a mail server enabled them to create a remote shell to the Linux machine. According to Qualys, “This bypasses all existing protections (like ASLR, PIE and NX) on both 32-bit and 64-bit systems.”

My advice to you is to now, not later today, now, update your Linux system as soon as possible. After patching it, you should then reboot the system. I know for Linux it’s rarely needed to reboot, but since gethostbyname is called on by so many core processes, such as auditd, dbus-daem, dhclient, init, master, mysqld, rsyslogd, sshd, udevd, and xinetd, you want to make absolutely sure that all your system’s running programs are using the patched code.

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Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/article/critical-linux-security-hole-found/

Windows vs Linux: The 2015 Version

Now that everyone has had time to examine Windows 10, it seems like a good time to finally do a proper Windows vs. Linux showdown. After all, I waited until Windows caught up in turns of features and user interface. For the sake of common sense, I’ve decided to use Ubuntu as our default Linux release.

In this article, I’ll hammer out the features for both platforms and compare them accordingly. Each platform has its strengths and weaknesses, and this article will help to shed some light on each of them.

The installation of the operating system

Both Windows 10 and Ubuntu Linux have straight forward OS installers. Simply follow the prompts as they’re presented to you.

Installing Ubuntu: Ubuntu’s installer generally points you to either installing their OS along side of an existing OS or installing over an existing Ubuntu install. The steps are simple if you already have another operating system installed. But if you’re looking to install Ubuntu over an existing Ubuntu installation, keeping your docs, settings and pictures require you to take one of the following approaches.

Option one, use Ubuntu’s backup tool before you install Ubuntu again. Option two, during the installation process, select “something else” to manually select which partitions are to be formatted. Obviously if Ubuntu is being installed on a new hard drive, this is a moot issue and a clean “Erase and install Ubuntu” option is perfectly acceptable. Personally, I always go with the “Something else” installation type. I prefer a dedicated home directory, which this option makes possible during partition setup.

One of the nice things about the Ubuntu installation is that you’re asked if you’d like to Encrypt your installation. In addition, a Logical Volume Manager (LVM) option is also presented. This makes resizing partitions in the future much easier, thanks to snapshots.

Installing Windows 10: While technically possible to install Windows 10 and Ubuntu along side of one another, Windows’ is famous for killing off GRUB, Ubuntu’s boot manager in the process. Therefore the preferred method has always been to install Windows first, then to install Ubuntu there after. Long story short, Windows doesn’t truly play nice with Ubuntu on the same machine by default. You’ll have to take steps to protect your Ubuntu installation if you wish to use both operating systems.

During a Windows 10 installation, the installer does a nice job of recognizing that you might wish to save your docs, settings and pictures. Instead of expecting you to have created a dedicated home partition or using a backup utility ahead of time, Windows 10 provides an option to backup this information on the fly. While it’s not a feature I personally would rely on, casual computer users will benefit from this feature.

Instead of a LVM feature, Windows 10 uses Storage Spaces for their server release. However, I’m not clear if this is the case for their typical desktop releases as they haven’t released officially yet. Assuming this will be provided, it will offer a LVM-like experience for Windows 10 users.

What’s interesting about Windows vs. Ubuntu, is that Windows (as of 8.1) provides encryption by default. Ubuntu, on the other hand, feels their users can best make this decision themselves. Will Windows 10 also have encryption turned on by default? My best guess is that it will in its final released version(s). And as most of us know, encryption is great until you’re unable to recover lost files. With Windows we’re asking Microsoft to hold onto our encryption keys where as with Ubuntu, it’s left in our own capable hands.

Windows 10 wins with its ability to easily protect and restore user data during a clean installation. However I feel they lose credibility with their encryption due to Microsoft’s involvement with various federal agencies.

Looking at the desktop

Ubuntu: After installing Ubuntu, you’re presented with your desktop and the Unity launcher. On the left, is the Launcher itself and the Dash. At the top of the screen, you’ll find your various indicators. When an icon on the Launcher is clicked, that application is immediately launched.

One thing that can take new Ubuntu users by surprise is how Unity lays things out with launched applications. Software appears as “launched” in the Launcher instead of appearing “minimized” at the bottom of the screen. Other new experiences for the non-Ubuntu user include using the Dash for locating applications, documents and other files. Perhaps the biggest shift for the newcomer would be the use of Lenses. Each lens offers different functionality. For example, a social lens would allow its users to parse content from connected social media sources.

Applications included with Ubuntu are carefully selected, like with any operating system. The idea is to make sure the end user has the basic applications needed to accomplish common tasks. These applications range from browsing the web to a completely free office suite. Additional applications can be found for Ubuntu through the Software Center, the Personal Package Archive (PPA) system and through other third party sources.

Windows 10: With Windows 10 installed, immediately you find that the release is struggling to let go of its Windows 8 roots. Whether or not this is a bad thing is entirely a personal perspective.

First thing you’ll notice is how the Start menu is setup. At its core, I think it’s an interesting idea. Blending Windows tiles with a traditional menu layout is definitely going to stir strong opinions. Also new is the push for Microsoft Office Online. The idea here is to bridge the gap between a localized Office experience and that of one that’s web based. With regard to the full version of Office 2016, the cost for this suite remains a mystery.

Article source: http://www.datamation.com/open-source/windows-vs-linux-the-2015-version-1.html

BOO! Grave bug in GNU C Library haunts Linux with remote-code exec

Security researchers have uncovered a critical bug in the GNU C Library (glibc), a key component of Linux and some other operating systems, which could render countless machines vulnerable to remote code execution attacks.

The flaw, which was discovered by Qualys and assigned CVE-2015-0235, is known as the GHOST vulnerability because it can be triggered by the library’s gethostbyname family of functions.

An attacker who successfully exploits the flaw can potentially gain complete control over an affected machine without any prior knowledge of system logins or passwords.

The exploit doesn’t attack the library directly. Rather, because so much software relies on the functions found in glibc, any number of programs running on affected machines could potentially be vulnerable.

The problem lies in the glibc code leading up to this C statement:

resbuf-h_name = strcpy (hostname, name);

strcpy() is dangerous and an obvious target in an audit because it blindly copies the entire contents of a zero-terminated buffer into another memory buffer without checking the size of the target buffer. name can end up containing more bytes than hostname expects to hold, allowing a heap overflow to occur. This, according to Qualys, can be exploited to achieve code execution despite malloc hardening to protect against heap attacks, and no-execute defenses in the CPU to stop unexpected execution of instructions.

The specific exploit disclosed by Qualys can be used against the Exim mail server, which is the default mail transfer agent on Debian Linux systems.

“During our testing, we developed a proof-of-concept in which we send a specially created e-mail to a mail server and can get a remote shell to the Linux machine,” Qualys CTO Wolfgang Kandek wrote in a blog post on Tuesday. “This bypasses all existing protections (like ASLR, PIE and NX) on both 32-bit and 64-bit systems.”

The vulnerability affects versions of glibc as far back as glibc-2.2, which was released in 2000.

Qualys posted complete details of the flaw on Tuesday, including snippets of code from applications that make use of the affected library routines, but only after working closely with several Linux vendors to patch the bug and offer a coordinated response.

Fixes for affected systems are already available from Debian, Red Hat, and Ubuntu.

According to Qualys, GHOST is not as widespread as it could be. The buggy routines in question are outdated and are no longer used by much software. Where they are used, they typically aren’t called in a way meets the criteria for the exploit.

Qualys says it has tested a number of other applications and servers that make use of the affected functions and has determined that they are not vulnerable, including apache, cups, dovecot, gnupg, isc-dhcp, lighttpd, mariadb/mysql, nfs-utils, nginx, nodejs, openldap, openssh, postfix, proftpd, pure-ftpd, rsyslog, samba, sendmail, sysklogd, syslog-ng, tcp_wrappers, vsftpd, and xinetd.

What’s more, patches that mend the flaw have actually been available since May 2013. Because they were not marked as security fixes, however, they weren’t incorporated into stable and long-term support versions of several distros. Among the affected versions are CentOS 6 and 7, Debian 7 (“wheezy”), Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

Qualys says the routines are definitely exploitable and that it has already developed proof-of-concept exploit code, which will soon be incorporated into a Metasploit plugin. But it’s holding off on making the attack code public, it says, until the vulnerability is no longer an immediate threat.

“We want to give everyone enough time to patch,” Qualys said. “According to our data once the vulnerability has reached its half-life we will release the exploit. Half-life is the time interval measuring a reduction of a vulnerability’s occurrence by half. Over time, this metric shows how successful efforts have been to eradicate vulnerability.” ®

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Article source: http://go.theregister.com/feed/www.theregister.co.uk/2015/01/27/glibc_ghost_vulnerability/

Dell Precision M3800 Mobile Workstation gains 4K, Thunderbolt 2 and Ubuntu …

dell4kubuntutb2toop

Dell makes damn good consumer computers, but the company really shines in the enterprise. Along with HP and Lenovo, the firm makes very solidly built and dependable workstations. Of all my years working in the corporate world, Dell has often been the brand of computers offered by the companies for which I have worked. Having dropped and abused many business-issued Dell laptops during travel, I have yet to have any issues beyond scuffs and dents — impressive.

One of Dell’s sexiest business machines is the Precision M3800 Mobile Workstation. Today, the company announces that the “thinnest and Lightest 15-Inch True Mobile Workstation” is getting some great new options that will make many professionals happy. You can now get a 4K display, Thunderbolt 2 and Ubuntu Linux to go with the Haswell Core i7 and NVIDIA Quadro K1100M.

“Starting today, the Dell Precision M3800 is available with 4K Ultra HD (3840×2160) resolution and IGZO2 technology on its vivid 15.6-inch UltraSharp touch display made with Corning Gorilla Glass NBT, delivering rich, saturated color and stunning brightness, and enabling customers to view their content in even greater detail than was possible before. With more than 8 million pixels, the 4K Ultra HD screen option is the highest resolution panel available on a 15-inch mobile workstation today, boasting 3.4 million more pixels than the Retina display on the Apple MacBook Pro 15-inch and allowing customers to experience 59 percent higher resolution. The Dell Precision M3800 display also features ten-finger multi-touch, providing customers with an intuitive way to interact with the workstation”, says Dell.

The manufacturer further explains that it is “expanding its ecosystem by adding a Thunderbolt 2 port to the Dell Precision M3800, so users can take advantage of transfer speeds up to 20Gbps, enabling viewing and editing of raw 4K video, while backing up the same file in parallel. Intel’s revolutionary Thunderbolt 2 technology delivers the fastest, most versatile connection, simultaneously supporting high-resolution displays and high-performance data devices through a single, compact port”.

thin

While the new hardware options are great, the really exciting thing is the option of having Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS pre-installed. While most professionals will likely opt for Windows 7 or 8.1, it is nice to have options. Dell has long been a proponent of Linux, by offering Ubuntu on other machines. With that said, I am not sure it is needed here.

Sure, some companies may find great success with Ubuntu, but it seems a bit wasteful to have so much horsepower behind the open-source operating system. In my experience, 4K support on Ubuntu and other distros has been very poor.

It also seems a bit silly for a company to lose the ability to run essential software like Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Office. Can a small business get by with Ubuntu and Libreoffice? Absolutely, but it probably doesn’t need a computer that starts at $1,699 either.

You can buy the refreshed machine here.

Article source: http://betanews.com/2015/01/27/dell-precision-m3800-mobile-workstation-gains-4k-thunderbolt-2-and-ubuntu-linux-options/

Should you use Windows 10 or Ubuntu?

By Jim Lynch

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In today’s open source roundup: Ubuntu versus Windows 10. Plus: Dell updates Developer Edition Linux laptops, and KDE Plasma 5.2 released and reviewed

ITworld |
January 27, 2015

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Windows 10 versus Ubuntu

In yesterday’s roundup I included two stories about Windows 10 and the fate of the Linux desktop. Today there’s a story at Datamation that compares Windows 10 with Ubuntu to see which one might be a better fit for readers.

Matt Hartley at Datamation reports:

I’ll be honest. From a visual point of view, I’m not a fan of the new Windows layout. While it’s far better than previous releases, it’s still not for me. Unfortunately, though, my opinion alone isn’t going to sway anyone from avoiding this release.

The first issue is that it’s going to be a free upgrade for a lot of Windows users. This means the barrier to entry and upgrade is largely removed. Second, it seems this time Microsoft has really buckled down on listening to what their users want. Many of the new features have allegedly been due to Windows feedback.

But the fact is, when you bother to include older peripherals and hardware, Linux still outshines Windows all day long in terms of hardware support. Try running anything from the XP era on your Windows 10 desktop, let me know how good the driver support is. Under Ubuntu, it just works. Window’s only advantage is having an edge with smoother graphics drivers.

More at Datamation

Dell updates Developer Edition laptops powered by Linux

Dell has updated its Linux-powered Developer Edition laptops, and they will also include Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

Lee Hutchinson reports for Ars Technica:

In addition to an upgraded XPS-13 Developer Edition based on Dell’s 2015 XPS-13 refresh, the line is adding a piece of workstation-class hardware: the Dell Precision M3800 mobile workstation, Developer Edition.

The branding is a bit of a mouthful, but the hardware to back it up is substantial. Built around Dell’s M3800 workstation-class laptop, the Developer Edition ships with what Dell Web Vertical Director Barton George calls “the vanilla image of the most recent LTS release (14.04).” The workstation’s default configuration includes a 15.6″ 1920×1080 display, 8GB of RAM, and a 500GB 7200 RPM hard drive, but it can be customized with up to 16GB of 1600MHz DDR3 RAM, a 1TB mSATA SSD, and a 15.6 UltraSharp IGZO UHD Touch display with 3840×2160 pixels.

The base configuration lists at $1533.50, while the price with upgrades comes up in the configuration tool as $2,765.50 (though about $1,000 of that is the 1TB SSD—going with a 256GB 2.5″ SSD instead of the mSATA 1TB option drops the price by $735 to $2,030.50).

More at Ars Technica

KDE Plasma 5.2 released

The KDE site has announced the release of Plasma 5.2.

Today KDE releases Plasma 5.2. This release adds a number of new components, many new features and many more bugfixes.

This release of Plasma comes with some new components to make your desktop even more complete:

BlueDevil: a range of desktop components to manage Bluetooth devices. It’ll set up your mouse, keyboard, send and receive files and you can browse for devices.

KSSHAskPass: if you access computers with ssh keys but those keys have passwords this module will give you a graphical UI to enter those passwords.

Muon: install and manage software and other addons for your computer.

Login theme configuration (SDDM): SDDM is now the login manager of choice for Plasma and this new System Settings module allows you to configure the theme.

KScreen: getting its first release for Plasma 5 is the System Settings module to set up multiple monitor support.

GTK Application Style: this new module lets you configure themeing of applications from Gnome.

KDecoration: this new library makes it easier and more reliable to make themes for KWin, Plasma’s window manager. It has impressive memory, performance and stability improvements. If you are missing a feature don’t worry it’ll be back in Plasma 5.3.

More at KDE

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Article source: http://www.itworld.com/article/2876233/should-you-use-windows-10-or-ubuntu.html

Donuts Win Another New gTLD .Express Beating Out Express.com: No ICANN …

Donuts has won yet another new gTLD string ahead winning .Express.

The only other applicant was submitted by Express.com who has now withdrawn their application.

This domain was scheduled for an ICANN Last Resort Auction.

There are now 11 new gTLD scheduled to go to an ICANN in February and 19 more for March.

As things have been going the vast majority of these will be settle ahead of time by private auction while some contention groups will ask and receive an extension.

Several contention sets that were  scheduled for an ICANN Last Resort Auction in  January got extensions until April.

 

Article source: http://www.thedomains.com/2015/01/27/donuts-win-another-new-gtld-express-beating-out-express-com-no-icann-last-resort-auctions-for-january/

The Big Read: It’s our ubuntu they’re looting

There were a lot of shameful pictures from Soweto that morning. The Times front-page picture showed policemen walking nonchalantly away from a shop that was being looted. There were similar images in other media.

I was visiting Meadowlands to see my grandmother’s sister. She is an elegant, sprightly, humane person who in her 80s still has more energy than most people I know. She reminds me, by her actions, why humanity is beautiful: courteous, happy, hard-working, caring, loving and generous.

As I drove into Soweto I tried to make sense of the Meadowlands of this fine lady and the anarchy around the township that was being reported by journalists.

There are so many elements to the story, eliciting so many emotions. Here are some of my thoughts, jumbled and confused:

The police and politicians kept telling the public that the looting was pure criminality, not xenophobia. I think we should be honest with ourselves. The targeted shops were owned by foreigners, particularly black foreigners such as Malawians and Somalis. Bangladeshi and Pakistani owners are not – neither now nor in 2008 – targeted as volubly as their darker counterparts. I cannot avoid a terrible thought: we hate ourselves, we hate our blackness and our black brothers.

The evidence is incontrovertible: the police, in large numbers, are aiding, abetting and even partaking in the looting in Soweto. Images in newspapers and on TV and social media show again and again South Africa’s finest walking away from scenes where they should be helping. The testimony from shop owners is chilling. In yesterday’s City Press a shop owner tells how he had to bribe police to escort him to his shop. Other stories tell of policemen helping people to queue up to “loot in an orderly manner” by getting inside shops four at a time. I am reminded of Rwanda, where Hutu policemen aided in the killing of their Tutsi neighbours.

Driving into Meadowlands I counted about six spaza shops that were open and trading. They are “South African owned”, I presume. There are many young men and women hanging out on street corners. This is not unusual – unemployment is high here. Life seems to be going on as usual. I am reminded of my journalism classes and my lecturer saying never to use the tired, worn, contradictory expression “calm but tense”. It is calm in Meadowlands. It is a far cry from the picture in that morning’s Business Day. Yet I must also say there are many Meadowlands, including the senseless attacks on fellow black shop owners, and the peaceful, calm of my grandmother.

My cousin, a staunch SA Commercial, Catering And Allied Workers’ Union organiser, says to me: “Ask anyone who organises in the retail and wholesale business what they see with these foreign-owned business and they will tell you that workers are treated inhumanely at these places. Everyone who works there is paid slave wages.”

Does that justify the looting? He says definitely not. He blames the government for not regulating the shops properly, and the police for failing to enforce labour and other laws.

A friend tells me that in Dobsonville on Friday morning looters were standing at street corners selling stolen goods. No one did anything. No one ever does anything.

“What is sad is that the same looters will be paying to get into taxis to shop at expensive shopping centres. They never ask themselves who those shopping centres belong to. They don’t realise that they are killing the economy in their own neighbourhood,” she says.

The reports and footage of women and men saying foreigners steal their work are ubiquitous. Yet local business people are very happy with these traders. They pay rent, says my childhood friend who rents a shop to a Bangladeshi trader. They pay on time, and they pay without squabble.

We have been here before. In 2008 we saw fellow citizens murdering Mozambicans, Zimbabweans and other foreigners. What have we learnt from that? What did we do this week that showed we had learnt from those shameful events?

My first visit to Meadowlands on Friday was in the morning. I went back at about 6.30pm, as the sun set over Soweto. My grandmother’s neighbours milled about, going about their usual activities. It reminded me of something that gave me hope: we are not all like those looters. We are a decent people, a peaceful people, a people who carry the spirit of ubuntu within us. We must not allow the looters to overwhelm and define us.

Article source: http://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2015/01/27/the-big-read-it-s-our-ubuntu-they-re-looting

Ubuntu Aims to Make the IoT Snappy

Canonical on Tuesday unveiled
Snappy Ubuntu Core, a new rendition of Ubuntu targeting the Internet of Things.

Snappy Ubuntu Core offers a minimal server image with the same libraries as “traditional” Ubuntu, if we can call it that, but Snappy apps and Ubuntu Core can be upgraded automatically and rolled back if necessary.

This so-called transactional or image-based systems management approach is ideal for deployments that require predictability and reliability, according to Canonical.

Snappy runs on any device with an ARMv7 or Intel x86 processor and at least 256 MB of RAM.

This “can be anything from home appliances to networking equipment to controlling solutions for heating, air conditioning and security,” said Maarten Ectors, VP of IoT, proximity cloud and next-gen networking at Canonical.

Oh, and it can run on robots too, but “don’t think Star Wars,” he cautioned.

“Think useful robots,” Ectors told LinuxInsider, “like the
Siralab Trasibot that soon will perform environmental studies in which industries and academic institutions can conduct pollution research by deploying Snappy Apps. Many other robots and drones are possible.”

Adding Snap to Software

Snappy Apps are a lightweight mechanism to package any software, Ectors said. Snappy Ubuntu images also can run inside virtual machines and in private clouds. Plus, Snappy Frameworks let Docker run inside Snappy Apps.

Snappy “is simply a package distribution/management for Ubuntu … with a transactional upgrade mechanism,” said Dan Kara, practice director of robotics at ABI Research.

That’s “‘transactional’ — as in succeed or be completely rolled back,” he told LinuxInsider. It simplifies the upgrade process and reduces the chances of rollback errors.

Docker and Security Issues

A number of security vulnerabilities have been discovered in Docker over the past few months.

However, Microsoft has found Docker robust enough to support the next release of Windows Server, in June, Kara disclosed, and it “is being employed in large, conservative businesses, and sectors such as finance and government.”

Snappy Ubuntu Core will ensure Snappy Apps “cannot harm the operating system and other Snappy Apps,” Canonical’s Ectors said. “Should there be bugs inside Docker, then Snappy Ubuntu Core is the easiest way to push bug fixes to devices running Docker images.”

Snappy Ubuntu Core “will not avoid a Shellshock or Heartbleed from happening,” he added. It “cannot magically avoid developers making any mistakes.” It will, however, enable the patching of “millions of devices in a secure way as soon as a fix is available.”

Developers are responsible for providing bug fixes for their Snappy Apps, including those containing Docker, Ectors noted.

What About the Competition?

Red Hat incorporated Docker in its Project Atomic well before Docker was incorporated into Ubuntu.

Then there’s CoreOS, an open source lightweight operating system based on the Linux kernel that provides only the minimal functionality required for deploying apps inside software containers. Sound familiar?

“Red Hat and CoreOS focus on the cloud,” Ectors pointed out. “Snappy Ubuntu Core is the only operating system that can run from a very small development board to the (US)$35 Odroid to network devices, robots, home appliances, to the biggest cloud — and have apps and an app store for any type of smart devices.”

Red Hat is “heavily focused on customers who value a standards-based approach to their architecture,” said Mark Coggin, senior director of marketing for Red Hat platforms business unit.

The Internet of Things is “more akin to enterprise IT, whose core tenets include system reliability, application integration, data integrity and security,” although it seems at a distance to be focused on devices and consumer technologies, he told LinuxInsider.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux “is well optimized to power the entire IoT architecture, from device to data center, and it is widely used across a variety of industries embracing this new architecture,” Coggin said. “Hence, there is no need to create an offering specifically for the device market.”


Richard Adhikari has written about high-tech for leading industry publications since the 1990s and wonders where it’s all leading to. Will implanted RFID chips in humans be the Mark of the Beast? Will nanotech solve our coming food crisis? Does Sturgeon’s Law still hold true? You can connect with Richard on
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Article source: http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/81618.html

Intel’s Education Content Access Point for Schools Runs Ubuntu

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Intel has launched a hardware device for schools called the Education Content Access Point, which is powered by Ubuntu, the open source, Linux-based operating system from Canonical.

It’s been a long time since Canonical‘s Ubuntu Linux has made big headlines in the education market. Thanks to Intel (INTC), however, the open source operating system may soon have a new presence in classrooms as part of the Intel Education Content Access Point.

You’re probably wondering what an education content access point is. According to Intel, this product “is an easy-to-use device that stores, manages, and publishes digital content for schools with low or intermittent connectivity. This comprehensive solution contains an access point plus content server.”

In other words, this is essentially a wireless router that can also store content uploaded by teachers and serve it to students inside a classroom.

Opportunities Rise In Education Market

Canonical Extends Snappy Ubuntu Core to Smart Devices

A device like this has obvious applicability in education markets where schools face limited Internet connectivity or a lack of hosting resources. Because the device is battery powered, it doesn’t require a reliable electricity source to run. Students can access content stored in the device using anything that runs a Web browser, meaning they don’t need to have a laptop to connect; a phone would work just as well. And the device can become a local wireless hotspot by connecting to a 3G network, another valuable feature in regions where wired Internet bandwidth is limited or non-existent.

Intel’s Access Point is also notable for being powered by Ubuntu—specifically, Ubuntu 12.04. Although there’s no indication that Canonical was involved in the device’s development or is making any major money off of it, it’s still a win for the company in promoting Ubuntu as a versatile operating system that can do innovative things in the education market.

To be sure, Canonical’s main ambitions these days lie a bit beyond devices like this wireless router. What the company really wants to see in the future is widespread use of Snappy Ubuntu Core to power smart devices of all stripes. The Education Content Access Point is not very new, with its unremarkable Atom processor and traditional Ubuntu OS, does nothing to advance Canonical’s Snappy Ubuntu Core plans. Still, it’s a reminder that Ubuntu has commercial viabilty outside traditional servers, laptops and PCs.

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Article source: http://thevarguy.com/ubuntu/012515/intels-education-content-access-point-schools-runs-ubuntu

Donuts Wins The Rights To Operate The New gTLD .Cafe Beating Out Co. That …

Donuts has picked up another new gTLD extension winning the rights to .Cafe, beating out Punto 2012 the registry that runs .Bar and .Rest.

The new gTLD string .Cafe was scheduled to go to the ICANN Last Resort auction later this Month.

Other new gTLD’s that touch .cafe include .Restaurant, which is operated by Donuts

.Eat was applied for by Google

.Food is in contention by three parties

.Rest one of the two strings owned by Punto 2012 and is meant to be a shortener for .Restaurant

 

Article source: http://www.thedomains.com/2015/01/25/donuts-wins-the-rights-to-operate-the-new-gtld-cafe-beating-out-co-that-runs-bar-rest/

Afilias Wins The .Bet new gTLD Beating Donuts, Famous Four & UK Gambling …

The new gTLD .Bet has been settled in what we can only guess was a private auction won by Afilias.

Afilias won the rights to operate the new Top Level Domain beating out two big portfolio applicants Donuts and Famous Four Media as well as Ladbrokes a publicly traded  British based gaming company.

According to Afilias  application with ICANN they expect to have 21K .Bet domain registrations by the end of year three.

.Bet was set to be resolved later this month in the ICANN Last Resort Auction.

Here is what else Afilias had to say about its plan to operate .Bet”

“There is a proliferation of betting sites across the existing TLD Internet space, creating consumer confusion about the validity or purpose of some sites. What about the future of betting? Beyond betting on sports or games of chance and skills, there is also a growing trend on the Internet where betting, decision science and forecasting are coming together.

Many emerging websites use betting and the “wisdom of crowds” to predict the outcome of life’s most interesting decisions and events. Who will win the next U.S. presidential election? Will private enterprise land a spacecraft on the Moon on or before December 31, 2012? Increasingly, when Internet users want to get an educated guess, they don’t ask the experts or the pundits, they go where people bet their money and reputations.

The purpose of the .BET TLD is to create an easily identifiable Internet namespace where the activities carried on are clearly understood and consumers visiting them would know exactly what they were getting and from whom. This creates value for registrants in that they can assume that visitors have arrived at their websites willingly and in full knowledge, so registrants have the opportunity to increase the professionalism and quality of their offerings, improving the quantity and quality of their marketplace offerings. Additionally, visionary entrepreneurs can work with allied and competitive registrants to create new online applications to create superior value for the consumers who buy a .BET domain name.

The .BET TLD mission is to become the professional badge that .BET registrants (betting industry vendors) and their betting customers can use to learn about responsible betting, play and conduct business.

Although the total number of gambling establishments worldwide approaches 5,000, we anticipate that many of those establishments will buy multiple domains, with both proactive and defensive intentions, and that changing laws and customs will allow for more innovation of offerings in this space.

Moreover, we expect that a fair amount of registrants plan to develop sites that are informative in nature, and not strictly dedicated to delivering new services. Therefore, we anticipate 21,100 domains under management (DUMs) by the end of the third year of operation.””

Article source: http://www.thedomains.com/2015/01/24/afilias-wins-the-bet-new-gtld-beating-donuts-famous-four-uk-gambling-co-ladbrokes/

Meizu m1 mini leaks in a live photo

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In reply to Anonymous @ 2015-01-23 15:46 from 2I1C – click to readI’m sorry, but what do you expect from a “mini” device? It’s on par with most introductory mini devices. HTC, Samsung, and LG are the only ones that do high-end mini’s. These phones that meizu are releasing are to prove a smartphone can saturate a market without being ludicrously expensive.

Furthermore, they are bringing an Ubuntu phone to market; it needs to be accessible to the general public, if there is going to be widespread adoption of the OS on smartphones.

Bq is pretty much doing the same thing over in Spain.

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  • 2015-01-24 23:36
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Article source: http://www.gsmarena.com/newscomm-10884.php

Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet Alpha 2

The next version of the ever-popular Ubuntu Linux distribution is in development and it will be called Vivid Vervet. There are only a few letters left in the alphabet before Canonical will have to come up with a new naming convention, but for now, the alliteration can continue.

Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet Alpha 2 release date

The final release of Ubuntu 15.04 is scheduled to be 23rd April, with the release candidate expected on the 16th.

Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet: where to download Alpha 2

You can download the Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha 2 right now, but only as:

The full list of downloads is here. The main Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha 2 (with the Unity desktop) isn’t yet available. So, if you choose to download one of the other variants, you won’t get to see the new Unity desktop features.

The latest Kubuntu build includes the Plasma 5 desktop (image above) which better supports monitors with high pixel densities.

As with the Windows 10 beta, it’s only for testing purposes and to get a feel for what the latest version of the Linux OS is like. It’s not for installation on your main computer where you need a stable operating system.

You can also – as ever – get the nightly build of Ubuntu for 32- and 64-bit computers with Intel or AMD processors.

Using the desktop images means you can try Vivid Vervet Alpha 2 without actually installing it, and is the type of image most people will want to use.

We’ll bring you more news on 15.04 Vivid Vervet soon.

Article source: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/linux/3595340/ubuntu-1504-vivid-vervet-alpha-2/