Ubuntu’s Snappy for Docker Containers Now Available on Google Cloud

Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, a leading Linux distributor, announced earlier this month the launch of Ubuntu Core, a stripped-down version of their OS that is specifically designed for large-scale cloud deployments that optimized for running applications within Dockers’ containers. Microsoft was the first cloud vendor to get on board with this, and made it available on Microsoft’s Azure cloud, and as of yesterday it will now also be available on Google’s Compute Engine, the giant’s Infrastructure-as-a-Service offering. An earlier preview edition, dubbed “Snappy,” was released last week.

Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu and Canonical wrote a post on his blog about the launch earlier this month with an accompanying YouTube video (featured below.) The post was titled ‘Announcing Ubuntu Core, with snappy transactional updates!’ It expresses excitement over the new launch, and explained how Ubuntu Core was developed as a result of lessons that have been learned from Canonical’s efforts to get Ubuntu running on phones, in their pursuit to improve reliability and security in the mobile market.

In the blog post Shuttleworth explained, “We call it “snappy” because that’s the new bullet-proof mechanism for app delivery and system updates; it’s completely different to the traditional package-based Ubuntu server and desktop. The snappy system keeps each part of Ubuntu in a separate, read-only file, and does the same for each application. That way, developers can deliver everything they need to be confident their app will work exactly as they intend, and we can take steps to keep the various apps isolated from one another, and ensure that updates are always perfect. Of course, that means that apt-get won’t work, but that’s OK since developers can reuse debs to make their snappy apps, and the core system is exactly the same as any other Ubuntu system – server or desktop.”

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Article source: http://www.cloudwedge.com/4891-ubuntus-snappy-for-docker-containers-now-available-on-google-cloud/

Ubuntu Phone Launches Pushed Until Early Next Year


ubuntu-hands-on-004

There isn’t much time left in 2014 so we suppose it comes as no surprise that Canonical, the parent company behind Ubuntu, recently confirmed that the first Ubuntu-powered smartphones have been delayed until “early” next year. The first Ubuntu-powered devices were originally scheduled to launch sometime in 2014.

“Canonical continues to work closely with its first selected hardware partners, Meizu and bq, to bring Ubuntu phones to market in Europe and China,” Canonical’s vice president of mobile Cristian Parrino recently told PCWorld, without discussing rollouts to other markets such as the United States. The phones are expected to cost somewhere between $200 and $400 when they do launch.

PCWorld, in its discussions with Parrinosuggested that the “release to manufacturer” (RTM) builds weren’t up-to-snuff according to Canonical’s standards, which caused a slight delay. Parrino also suggested that Canonical doesn’t want to release a half-baked operating system and that the team is working to make sure everything is “just right” and will please consumers who use its software on new smartphones.

Mobile World Congress kicks off in early March, and it’s possible we’ll hear more on Canonical’s news there, if not before then, given the show’s large focus on mobile technology.

Article source: http://www.technobuffalo.com/2014/12/20/ubuntu-phone-launches-pushed-until-early-next-year/

Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha, Tanglu 2 Review, and More Red Hat

Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha, Tanglu 2 Review, and More Red Hat

by Susan Linton – Dec. 19, 2014Comments (0)

tangluJust when you thought you couldn’t get anymore Red Hat news, it once again was the talk of the techtown. An interest blog post from Hanno Böck today says quit using NTP if you care about security. Jack M. Germain discusses the work of Open Invention Network and Jamie Watson reviews Debian-derivative Tanglu 2. Dedoimedio.com shares their best distro of 2014 and Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha 1 was released.

Red Hat continued to dominate the headlines today after yesterday’s encouraging financial report. Red Hat stock hit a 52-week high today of $70.11 and is currently trading after hours at $68.09. TheStreet has compiled a list of the latest ratings from analysts all approaching or hitting the $80 price target. Investors.com has a few more in the same neighborhood.

CNBC asked CEO Jim Whitehurst does Red Hat being Open Source make it more vulnerable to cyberattacks (as opposed to proprietary I suppose). Whitehurst answered, “I think open source itself is proving to be very safe. The simple analogy here is; are you safer in a crowded shopping mall or down a dark alley? Having the wisdom of the crowd is actually a powerful thing.” Elsewhere, ComputerWeekly.com is running a piece on Red Hat’s new Sky News gig and long-time Red Hat and Fedora developer Dave Jones is “moving on.”

Larry Cafiero offered up his Linux predictions for 2015 today, but it sounded more like he was thinking April Fool’s Day. One prediction has the Guardians Opposing systemD cracking into and blackmailing the studio responsible for “The Lennart Poettering Story.” Another has Linux Mint going upscales and rebranding itself as “Linux Merlot,” but then non-drinkers will get mad and fork it into “Linux Thin Mint.” Perhaps the best one has Sugar on a Stick expanding into new areas like “Sugar on Whole Wheat with a side of chips.” There’s lots more, so be sure to check that out.

Dedoimedio.com said Ubuntu 14.04 was the best distro of the year and Fedora 20 came in fifth. Jamie Watson blogged today Tanglu 2.0 doesn’t play well with UEFI but otherwise is an interesting alternative Debian Testing derivative. The Register covered the latest court decision in SCO versus IBM that arrived Monday.

In other news:

* Don’t update NTP – stop using it

* The Open Invention Network Defending the Free Linux World

* Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha 1 Releases Now Ready for Download

* The Document Foundation Announces LibreOffice 4.3.5

* Jim Zemlin: 2014 The Open Source Tipping Point

* Richard Stallman: What Does It Mean for Your Computer to Be Loyal?

* Free software GNU/Linux laptop in development

  • ubuntu
  • linux
  • Red Hat
  • debian
  • OIN
  • LibreOffice
  • Tanglu

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Article source: http://ostatic.com/blog/ubuntu-15-04-alpha-tanglu-2-review-and-more-red-hat

Open Bay lets you run your own copy of The Pirate Bay—emphasis on "copy"

Legendary file-sharing site The Pirate Bay may have finally been forced offline, but that doesn’t mean that the less-than-legal file-sharing scene has slowed down—the shady BitTorrent hydra has many more heads to take The Pirate Bay’s place. In fact, if the folks at torrent site Isohunt have their way, there will very soon be many, many more heads: the site has released an open sourced “copy” of The Pirate Bay called “Open Bay” that anyone with access to a Web server can install and run.

The Open Bay project maintainers have set up a GitHub repository for the Open Bay application and written instructions covering how to get your very own Open Bay site up and running—complete with example configuration files. To make it work, you need at minimum a Web server running Apache or Nginx and PHP (either with mod_php or PHP-FPM or whatever other PHP method you prefer); since we’ve got one of those in our closet, we decided to take a crack at installing the application to see how it works.

What Open Bay is not

I was hoping that Open Bay would be a full-featured Bittorrent site wherein I could both search for and also add torrents; I’d planned on setting everything up and then offering out a complete set of Linux ISO torrent links to prove that it worked. However, it’s important to be clear at the outset that Open Bay’s primary purpose is to be a copy of The Pirate Bay.

The key word here is “copy,” because to really make Open Bay work for you, you either need to use Isohunt’s remote torrent database—which makes Open Bay really just a self-hosted front end rather than a full featured torrent site—or you need to download an almost 900MB torrent database dump (which comes as a 441MB gzipped CSV file with about 8 million torrents and their associated magnet link hashes, sourced from The Pirate Bay as well as other torrent sites). The intent is that you first set up the Open Bay application, then either point it at Isohunt’s database or dump the CSV file into your own MySQL database. Once you’ve brought these two halves together, the resultant whole is a torrent search site with about 8 million working torrents you can search through and download.

What you can’t do is list your own torrents—at least, not without directly adding them to the MySQL database. This definitely helps keep the Open Bay application simpler both from a development perspective and also for would-be Open Bay administrators to install and configure, but it also limits the application’s usefulness. For right now, it’s really good for only one thing: running a static sort-of copy of The Pirate Bay.

Forging ahead anyway

But, what the heck, it’s Friday, so we set it up anyway—though without importing the large database dump needed to really fill out its functionality.

We’ve already got our Nginx Web server humming along, so we cloned the GitHub repository down into a spare directory. Easy so far!

There’s an included Nginx example configuration file, so we did a bit of tweaking on that so that it matched our setup and worked with HTTPS; we also added a CNAME to our local bind9 DNS server so that we could hit the site up directly by name. Our PHP-FPM configuration was already in pretty good shape, so we left that alone.

After reloading Nginx, we headed to our new Open Bay site, which greeted us with the setup screens:


Setup time. If you’ve done everything right, this is what you’ll see when you hit Open Bay the first time.

Canonical’s “Snappy Ubuntu” Lands On AWS


Canonical’s stripped down “Snappy” edition of Ubuntu Core is now available on Amazon’s AWS cloud computing platform.

If you’ve followed along over the last few weeks, that’s not a major surprise. Snappy first launched on Microsoft Azure at the beginning of this month and then arrived on Google’s Compute Engine platform earlier this week. It was pretty obvious that AWS’s EC2 would be next.

snappyIf you’re a developer on AWS, you can now use Canonical’s Ubuntu Core machine image to quickly launch a new Snappy instance. Because of the way Snappy works, it only supports hardware virtual machines (HVMs) on EC2.

By default, Snappy doesn’t come with any frameworks or apps installed in order to keep the image as small as possible. Installing apps on Snappy is a bit different from the usual apt-get you may be used to on Linux because Canonical has developed its own system for app installs that isolates the different packages you install for security reasons. This also means that Snappy can do transactional updates to ensure that a failed update can never bring your system down (because it can always roll back to the old version).

While you could run a standalone Snappy-based server, it’s really meant for large containerized installs and that’s where the advantage of a minimalist and secure system like this comes into play.

“Ubuntu Core builds on the world’s favourite container platform and provides transactional updates with rigorous application isolation,” Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth said when Snappy launched. “This is the smallest, safest platform for Docker deployment ever, and with snappy packages, it’s completely extensible to all forms of container or service.”

If you’re interested in giving it a try, here is a step-by-step guide for getting started with Snappy on AWS.

Article source: http://techcrunch.com/2014/12/19/canonicals-snappy-ubuntu-lands-on-aws/

Experian plc: Experian Data Quality sends employees to Ubuntu Education Fund …

Experian Data Quality sends employees to Ubuntu Education Fund Center in South Africa in support of educational partnership
Leading data quality company works with nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering children

Boston, Mass., Dec. 16, 2014 – Experian Data Quality, a part of Experian Marketing Services and a leading provider of data quality software and services, in continuation of its relationship with Ubuntu Education Fund (Ubuntu), recently sent employees on a service trip to the Ubuntu Center in South Africa. Ubuntu Education Fund is a grassroots nonprofit organization dedicated to fundamentally transforming the lives of children and their families in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.


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The employees, who just returned from the weeklong trip, spent their time working closely with children at the center and helping to support Ubuntu’s various educational programs. The goal of the trip was for the employees to understand the Port Elizabeth community better and directly experience the need Ubuntu Education Fund helps solve in that region.

“The Ubuntu Education Fund has accomplished a truly unique achievement. It has fully integrated itself and been accepted into the community in which it serves. It takes an unwavering determination to a cause to achieve this,” said Richard Mazzola, Web marketing specialist at Experian Data Quality. “Experiencing this determination first hand made it really apparent that what we invest in are the people of Ubuntu, not just the cause.”

Earlier this year, Ubuntu received a donation from Experian, who were connected to Ubuntu through their Aid for Africa membership, to kick-start the partnership as part of the company’s committed initiative to invest in the early education and development of youth in the region. Experian® chose to partner with Ubuntu because of the organization’s demonstrated commitment to and impact on children’s access to the worlds of higher education and employment, allowing them to grow into healthy adults.

“We were grateful for the supplies provided by Experian Data Quality this summer, and this recent trip speaks of its commitment to improving the development of the children in Port Elizabeth. We’re honored to call Experian Data Quality a partner and look forward to continuing our work together in the coming years” said Jacob Lief, CEO and founder of Ubuntu Education Fund.

Contact:
Erin Haselkorn
Experian Public Relations
1 617 385 6700
erin.haselkorn@experian.com

Ubuntu Education Fund
Ubuntu Education Fund is a grassroots nonprofit organization dedicated to providing vulnerable children in the Townships of Port Elizabeth, South Africa, what all children deserve-everything. By integrating into the community and taking a comprehensive holistic approach, Ubuntu ensures that children in Port Elizabeth receive support from cradle to career. Currently providing more than 2,000 children and each of their family members, with world-class health care, long-term education support, and household counselling, Ubuntu ensures that each child can grow into a healthy and successful adult. For 15 years, Ubuntu has worked to create an environment where people in Port Elizabeth have all the resources needed to achieve their personal and professional goals, breaking the cycle of poverty for generations to come. Ubuntu Education Fund is a registered nonprofit organization in SA, US, and UK. For more information, please visit www.ubuntufund.org.

About Experian Data Quality
Experian Data Quality is a global leader in providing data quality software and services to organizations of all sizes. We help our clients to proactively manage the quality of their data through world-class validation, matching, enrichment and profiling capabilities. With flexible software-as-a-service and on-premise deployment models, Experian Data Quality software allows organizations around the world to truly connect with their customers by delivering intelligent interactions, every time.

Established in 1990 with offices throughout the United States, Europe and Asia Pacific, Experian Data Quality has more than 8,000 clients worldwide in retail, finance, education, insurance, government, healthcare and other sectors. For more information, visit http://www.qas.com.

About Experian
We are the leading global information services company, providing data and analytical tools to our clients around the world. We help businesses to manage credit risk, prevent fraud, target marketing offers and automate decision making. We also help people to check their credit report and credit score, and protect against identity theft.  In 2014, we were named by Forbes Magazine as one of the ‘World’s Most Innovative Companies’.

We employ approximately 16,000 people in 39 countries and our corporate headquarters are in Dublin, Ireland, with operational headquarters in Nottingham, UK; California, US; and São Paulo, Brazil.
Experian plc is listed on the London Stock Exchange (EXPN) and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 index. Total revenue for the year ended March 31, 2014, was US$4.8 billion.

To find out more about our company, please visit http://www.experianplc.com or watch our documentary, ‘Inside Experian‘.

Experian and the Experian marks used herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Other product and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.


distributed by


This noodl was issued by Experian plc and was initially posted at www.experiangroup.com. It was distributed, unedited and unaltered, by noodls on 2014-12-18 17:50:58 UTC. The issuer is solely responsible for the accuracy of the information contained therein.

Article source: http://www.twst.com/update/92894-experian-plc-experian-data-quality-sends-employees-to-ubuntu-education-fund-center-in-south-africa-in-support-of-educational-partnership

Experian Data Quality sends employees to Ubuntu Education Fund Center in … – SYS


<![CDATA[

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BOSTON, Dec. 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Experian Data Quality, a part of Experian Marketing Services and a leading provider of data quality software and services, in continuation of its relationship with Ubuntu Education Fund (Ubuntu), recently sent employees on a service trip to the Ubuntu Center in South Africa. Ubuntu Education Fund is a grassroots nonprofit organization dedicated to fundamentally transforming the lives of children and their families in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

Experian Data Quality and Ubuntu Education Fund staff working with children at the Ubuntu Center in Port Elizabeth South Africa (Ubuntu Education Fund/ Tim Hans)Experian Data Quality and Ubuntu Education Fund staff working with children at the Ubuntu Center in Port Elizabeth South Africa (Ubuntu Education Fund/ Tim Hans)

The employees, who just returned from the weeklong trip, spent their time working closely with children at the center and helping to support Ubuntu’s various educational programs. The goal of the trip was for the employees to understand the Port Elizabeth community better and directly experience the need Ubuntu Education Fund helps solve in that region.

“The Ubuntu Education Fund has accomplished a truly unique achievement. It has fully integrated itself and been accepted into the community in which it serves. It takes an unwavering determination to a cause to achieve this,” said Richard Mazzola, Web marketing specialist at Experian Data Quality. “Experiencing this determination first hand made it really apparent that what we invest in are the people of Ubuntu, not just the cause.”

Earlier this year, Ubuntu received a donation from Experian, who were connected to Ubuntu through their Aid for Africa membership, to kick-start the partnership as part of the company’s committed initiative to invest in the early education and development of youth in the region. Experian® chose to partner with Ubuntu because of the organization’s demonstrated commitment to and impact on children’s access to the worlds of higher education and employment, allowing them to grow into healthy adults.

“We were grateful for the supplies provided by Experian Data Quality this summer, and this recent trip speaks of its commitment to improving the development of the children in Port Elizabeth. We’re honored to call Experian Data Quality a partner and look forward to continuing our work together in the coming years,” said Jacob Lief, CEO and founder of Ubuntu Education Fund.

Ubuntu Education Fund
Ubuntu Education Fund is a grassroots nonprofit organization dedicated to providing vulnerable children in the Townships of Port Elizabeth, South Africa, what all children deserve—everything. By integrating into the community and taking a comprehensive holistic approach, Ubuntu ensures that children in Port Elizabeth receive support from cradle to career. Currently providing more than 2,000 children and each of their family members with world-class health care, long-term education support, and household counselling, Ubuntu ensures that each child can grow into a healthy and successful adult. For 15 years, Ubuntu has worked to create an environment where people in Port Elizabeth have all the resources needed to achieve their personal and professional goals, breaking the cycle of poverty for generations to come. Ubuntu Education Fund is a registered nonprofit organization in SA, US, and UK. For more information, please visit www.ubuntufund.org.

About Experian Data Quality
Experian Data Quality is a global leader in providing data quality software and services to organizations of all sizes. We help our clients to proactively manage the quality of their data through world-class validation, matching, enrichment and profiling capabilities. With flexible software-as-a-service and on-premise deployment models, Experian Data Quality software allows organizations around the world to truly connect with their customers by delivering intelligent interactions, every time.

Established in 1990 with offices throughout the United States, Europe and Asia Pacific, Experian Data Quality has more than 8,000 clients worldwide in retail, finance, education, insurance, government, healthcare and other sectors. For more information, visit http://www.qas.com.

About Experian

We are the leading global information services company, providing data and analytical tools to our clients around the world. We help businesses to manage credit risk, prevent fraud, target marketing offers and automate decision making. We also help people to check their credit report and credit score, and protect against identity theft.  In 2014, we were named by Forbes Magazine as one of the ‘World’s Most Innovative Companies’.

We employ approximately 16,000 people in 39 countries and our corporate headquarters are in Dublin, Ireland, with operational headquarters in Nottingham, UK; California, US; and Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Experian plc is listed on the London Stock Exchange (EXPN) and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 index. Total revenue for the year ended March 31, 2014, was US$4.8 billion.

To find out more about our company, please visit http://www.experianplc.com or watch our documentary, ‘Inside Experian‘.

Experian and the Experian marks used herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of Experian Information Solutions, Inc. Other product and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

Contact:

Erin Haselkorn
Experian Public Relations
1 617 385 6700
[email protected]

Experian Data QualityExperian Data Quality

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141212/164127

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140915/146097

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/experian-data-quality-sends-employees-to-ubuntu-education-fund-center-in-south-africa-in-support-of-educational-partnership-300009016.html

SOURCE Experian Data Quality

Article source: http://www.sys-con.com/node/3264360

Ubuntu Phone launch delayed until early 2015

Earlier this year, I reported on the forthcoming release of Ubuntu phones. Ubuntu for phones had just hit “release to manufacturer” status and phones were supposed to launch before the end of 2014.

Bad news: The phones clearly won’t be here this year. But good news! Canonical told me they’ll be out in early 2015, after a slight delay to clean up some lingering interface and manufacturing snags.

Hardware partners still onboard

Cristian Parrino, Canonical’s VP of mobile, told me that both Meizu and Bq are still onboard to manufacture Ubuntu Phones for the launch. There’s been some speculation that Bq at least was less interested after a big Bq press conference came and went with no mention of Ubuntu phone.

“Canonical continues to work closely with its first selected hardware partners, Meizu and bq, to bring Ubuntu phones to market in Europe and China,” he told me. Meizu will cover China, while Bq will cover Europe. It’s unclear how customers in the rest of the world will get their hands on such devices, although Canonical recently signed a “strategic agreement” with Meizu.

OMG! Ubuntu! reports it was privately told the deal with Meizu will allow Canonical to distribute Meizu-produced Ubuntu phones to customers in the USA and elsewhere via online sales channels. So, if you’re not in China or Europe, you should be able to order an Ubuntu phone online (assuming OMG! Ubuntu’s report proves accurate).

Polishing software and assembling hardware

There seems to be no single cause for the delay.

One factor, Parrino says, is that “Ubuntu for phones will be introducing a brand new way for users to interact with their devices—and through constant user testing, we want to make sure that the initial experience is just right.” This mirrors other reports I’ve heard from people who spent more time testing the initial RTM builds of Ubuntu phone. Apparently, the first RTM builds weren’t really finished enough to be considered stable. The software needed more time and bug fixes, and Ubuntu’s been working on that. But, presumably, those RTM builds have allowed Bq and Meizu to get some hands-on time with the software and begin testing it on their devices.

ubuntu touch meizu mx4 photo taken from meizus blog

The Meizu MX4 Ubuntu phone.

Parrino also said that “partner-side supply chain considerations—availability of specific hardware components for the device, such as screens, hasn’t lined up perfectly with our initially aspired timelines.” This is quite interesting, as it initially seemed the Ubuntu devices would be versions of existing Android devices with Ubuntu slapped on them instead. We’ll hopefully see phone hardware designed more specifically for Ubuntu.

So, when can I get my hands on one?

Parrino says Canonical “will be announcing the imminent availability of the first Ubuntu phones early next year.” So just hold on tight; Ubuntu phones are coming, and we should be hearing more soon.

Want to stay up to date on Linux, BSD, Chrome OS, and the rest of the World Beyond Windows? Bookmark the World Beyond Windows column page or follow our RSS feed.

If you’ve been following Ubuntu phone, it’s not great to hear about yet another delay. These phones were originally supposed to be released in early 2014, and then before the end of 2014, and now sometime in early 2015. Canonical clearly underestimated the difficulties of launching a product in the mobile market and needed more time. But, it could be worse: Ubuntu Phone should hopefully be good and stable when it’s released.

It does seem like the phones are closer to being released now, though. OMG! Ubuntu! is even reporting that a Bq Ubuntu phone will be released in Europe in February.

Hopefully I’ll be able to get my hands on one of these Ubuntu phones soon. Unfortunately, the most interesting “convergence” features won’t arrive with the first Ubuntu phones. Unity 8 and Mir just aren’t ready for desktop prime time yet, so we’ll have some waiting to do even after we get the hardware. The Ubuntu desktop has seen few changes this past year as Canonical focuses all their effort on Ubuntu phones and desktop convergence, so we’re all itching for some new developments.

Now for the lingering question: Where are those Ubuntu TVs and tablets?

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2861446/ubuntu-phone-launch-delayed-until-early-2015.html

Ubuntu Core heads to Google Cloud

Google is bringing Canonical's slimmed down Linux distro Ubunto Core to GCE

Google is bringing Canonical’s slimmed down Linux distro Ubunto Core to GCE

Canonical has announced the company is bringing its latest OS innovation Ubuntu Core to Google Compute Engine.

Last week Ubuntu took the wraps off Ubuntu Core, a slimmed-down, re-architected version of the Ubuntu operating system the company said is ideal for container-oriented deployments using tools like Docker and Kubernetes.

Ubuntu Core includes the same core libraries that Ubuntu carries, but the company has opted to let users select the frameworks they wish to place on top of that core. It uses the AppArmor kernel security system to isolate individual applications and frameworks, using MAC-based isolation and “human-friendly” security profiles, and the operating system allows for transactional updates to the OS and apps running on top.

The OS was initially only available on Microsoft Azure.

“Ubuntu Core is the leanest and most efficient version of Ubuntu for cloud deployments with a particular focus on Docker and containers,” said Robbie Williamson, vice president of cloud engineering at Canonical.

“We’re delighted to bring Ubuntu Core, with snappy packages, to Google Cloud Platform, which is widely recognised for its performance and Google’s emphasis on container technologies,” he said.

Canonical’s move to broaden the reach of its latest Linux offering comes the same week Red Hat extended RHEL support to SAP HANA and SAP-certified public cloud partners like Virtustream.

Article source: http://www.businesscloudnews.com/2014/12/17/ubuntu-core-heads-to-google-cloud/

.Club takes 6 out of the top 10 New gTLD Sales on Sedo in 2014

club-logo211

Sedo reported their top 10 new gTLD sales of 2014 and .club dominated the list with 6 out of 10. Things seem to be on the upswing as the company raised another $3million according to DomainNameWire.

Upswing in new gTLDs such as .club and .berlin

More than 300 new TLDs have been launched in the market in 2014 and currently there are more than 3.5 million new domains registered.  The trading among new gTLD domains is already in full swing and the development of sales at Sedo’s marketplace has been positive. It is still too early to draw any conclusions about the success of the new extensions but the initial sales we’ve seen are good indicators for future price developments industry-wide. There will be even more new TLDs coming to market in 2015, and from that we will assemble new data and information about the development of new gTLDs. In 2014, the highest sale of a new gTLD name was a confidential sale for $100,000.

These were the highest public new gTLD domain name sales at Sedo in 2014:
1) baltic.cruises                 25,000 US-Dollar
2) eat.club                           20,000 US-Dollar
3) english.club                   17,500 US-Dollar
4) jobboerse.berlin         8,000 Euro
5) joy.club                           10,000 US-Dollar
6) penguin.club                 8,000 US-Dollar
6) havana.club                   8,000 US-Dollar
7) viking.cruises                5,500 Euro
8) ritz.club                           7,500 US-Dollar
9) uhr.kaufen                    4,200 Euro
10) lossless.audio             5,000 US-Dollar

Article source: http://www.thedomains.com/2014/12/18/club-takes-6-out-of-the-top-10-new-gtld-sales-on-sedo-in-2014/

China Mobile launches Ubuntu contest for developers

ubuntu Saleha Riaz

by

China Mobile and Canonical have launched the ‘Ubuntu Developer Innovation Contest’ to engage developers “with the next generation of mobile experiences on Ubuntu – which don’t revolve around apps and the app icon grid”.

Contest submissions can include Scopes and Apps (HTML5 and QML native), and finalists will be selected for two tracks – student and independent developers.

The competition is open to university students, independent developers and the open source community in the country.

Prizes for the submission of best mobile experiences on Ubuntu include around $11,000 in cash, mobile devices, and an internship opportunity.

According to a statement by Canonical, “Ubuntu gives developers the unprecedented opportunity to create app-like experiences that are integral to the device, at a fraction of the cost of building and maintaining traditional apps. These experiences are developed using Ubuntu Scopes, a new UI toolkit available through the Ubuntu SDK.”

Currently, there is no commercially-available hardware running the Ubuntu mobile OS (although deals have been struck with Spanish player bq and China’s Meizu).

Back in July, Cristian Parrino, VP of mobile and online services for Canonical, told Mobile Asia Daily that creating a base of user advocates from existing “fans” of Meizu and Ubuntu will be key to driving the early success of Ubuntu in the mobile market.

The competition is part of China Mobile’s “AND Your Dream Come True” Million Youth Entrepreneurship and Employment Program, a venture between the Communist Youth League Central Committee and China Mobile.

Developers can get involved by visiting the official website at “Complete Your Dream” Million Youth Entrepreneur Plan. The deadline for entry is 30 April 2015, and finalists will be selected in June 2015.

Article source: http://www.mobileworldlive.com/china-mobile-launches-ubuntu-contest-developers

Time to join hands in spirit of ubuntu

DOC
Minister in the Presidency for Perfomance, Monitoring and Evaluation, Mr Jeff Radebe. File photo: Linda Mthombeni

The task of reconciling a nation is not merely the duty of the government alone but a societal responsibility, writes Jeff Radebe.

 

The task of reconciling and uniting people who for many years lived as adversaries was always going to be a painful and difficult task. Reconciliation affects every aspect of our life as a country. It is not a once-off event but a process. It demands that we work together and look beyond our differences. This is the legacy our founding father and former president Nelson Mandela left us with.

This year is the second time we observed National Reconciliation Day without Madiba but his legacy of a united and prosperous country lives on in each and every one of us. Tata was laid to rest on December 15 last year and we honoured his memory a day later with the unveiling of a 9m statue at the Union Buildings. He and other leaders, made enormous sacrifices for our country. Some paid with their lives so that we may be free and celebrate this day.

Together they achieved the impossible by convincing those who did not see eye to eye prior to 1994 to find each other and work towards building a country based on the values of our Constitution. Our Constitution lays the foundation for an open society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights and is regarded around the world as very progressive.

December 16 is used to foster reconciliation and national unity in the true spirit of our late icon as he had envisaged at the start of our democracy. It also serves as a reminder of how far we have come in uniting the country and of the challenges that still lie ahead.

This year’s commemoration under the theme: “Social Cohesion, Reconciliation and National Unity in the 20 years of Democracy” coincides with South Africa celebrating 20 years of freedom.

As a nation, we have come a long way in healing the wounds of the past and in building an inclusive society. The government has over the past 20 years provided leadership in creating an enabling environment for achieving this. It successfully laid the foundation for the removal of obstacles that divided our people on the basis of race, culture, religion or language.

As part of our reconciliation we began to ensure the equal spread of national resources. The government started to provide basic services such as water, sanitation, electricity, houses, health and education for those who were deprived prior to 1994.

Reconciliation also required the government to tackle the triple challenge of unemployment, poverty and inequality. We have taken decisive steps to promote economic growth through the implementation of the National Development Plan, the National Infrastructure Plan, the New Growth Path and the Industrial Policy Action Plan.

But the task of reconciling a nation is not merely the duty of the government alone but a societal responsibility. Through our collective effort and perseverance we can achieve the social harmony Mandela spoke about and be able to advance national reconciliation.

As citizens we need to reach out to each other and break down the barriers that still define us 20 years into our democracy.

We need to ask ourselves whether we have done enough to confront and overcome the stereotypes and myths entrenched over years under colonisation and apartheid. We remain concerned over the racism-related incidents across the country. They are unacceptable and go against our goal of building a society based on the ethos of ubuntu where everyone feels valued, respected and safe.

Reconciliation requires of us to confront our past and educate fellow South Africans of the past wrongs committed against black people. A major step towards reconciliation is to acknowledge that apartheid was a crime against humanity.

Addressing the National Council of Provinces in 1998, Madiba said: “What has been revealed in the TRC shows not only what human beings can do to other human beings, but has confirmed the condemnation by the international community that apartheid was a crime against humanity. To kill people without bringing them before a court of law; to bury them secretly; this is an illustration of how apartheid is an evil against humanity.”

It is disheartening that the 2014 SA Reconciliation Barometer, published by the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, shows that 25 percent of South Africans feel apartheid was not a crime. We should take this survey as a call to action to do more in educating and raising awareness about the injustices and violence perpetrated by the apartheid regime against the majority of people. The youth, in particular, should know our history to avoid repeating the same mistakes in the future.

*Jeff Radebe is Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.

Pretoria News


Article source: http://www.iol.co.za/pretoria-news/opinion/time-to-join-hands-in-spirit-of-ubuntu-1.1796430

The Real Facts About New gTLDs

Many with financial interests in new gTLDs, such as Donuts, have painted a rosy picture of how new gTLDs create greater availability of meaningful domain name options that the global masses have been waiting for. Their message seems to be: FINALLY, there is an alternative to .com in new domain extensions like .guru, .photography, .blackfriday and .tips. But, the reality is that we have always had options other than .com to choose from when registering a domain name. The challenge isn’t choice, its relevance and credibility.

While all of this bravado is par for the course in marketing new products, the real shame is that the registrants whom these new gTLDS were supposedly intended to serve may be the ones who suffer in the end when they invest their time and money into branding or rebranding their businesses with new gTLDs without all of the facts.

It’s been well under a year since the first new gTLDs became available for registration; however, we are already seeing several troubling trends that are being glossed over, including:

  • Data reported by ntldstats.com shows considerable drop off in new registrations for the top five new gTLDs. Even with an assumed renewal rate upwards of 80 percent, as recently forecast by Donuts, if there is no solid growth to offset even a seemingly small loss, at the end of the day — or financial year — most new gTLDs will see their customer base shrink.
  • The number of UDRP/URS cases filed in new gTLDs is more than 15x higher than all other domains, indicating that brands are not going to play the defensive registration game (For more info and a list of UDRP cases filed, read The Domains’ article).
  • Plurals and synonyms of new gTLDS continue to be deployed, making it difficult and confusing for registrants.
  • About a fourth of the new gTLDs registered to date were given away for free or registered by the registry or a related party, according to The Domains, raising questions about the behavior and motives of those who cite registration numbers as a sign of the popularity of a new TLD. DomainNameWire recently published a relevant analysis of new gTLDs titled, “Lies, damned lies, and new TLD statistics.”
  • Noted DNS expert and ICANN Security Advisor Paul Vixie warned that some new gTLDs will be blocked by many because of collision security issues. If new gTLDs don’t resolve everywhere, what will that do to their value?

These are but a few of the realities that you won’t hear about from some of the new gTLD sellers. This is why new gTLDs do themselves a disservice by comparing themselves to .com, which has a record of growth and stability. Domainers, Internet experts and business owners alike agree.

All one has to do is take a look at the “data” being used to tout the benefits on new gTLDs to see that the argument to invest should be met with strong skepticism. For example, a recent CircleID post from the CEO of Donuts states with regard to search, “Internet addresses registered in new gTLDs are holding their own against — and in some cases outperforming — comparable addresses registered in legacy domains like .COM.” However, the examples cited clearly show the comparable .com domains performing better. This is equally true for .com domains that don’t contain any of the keywords of the new gTLDs referenced. That’s because the most important factor for search is the quality of the content on the site, while the most important factor in domain registration is choosing a globally recognized, used and trusted TLD like .com, a point echoed by Google’s John Mueller recently. Mueller, whose title is Webmaster Trends Analyst at Google, felt the need to set the record straight and wrote the following on his Google+ page on Dec. 11, 2014:

“It feels like it’s time to re-share this again. There still is no inherent ranking advantage to using the new TLDs… If you see posts claiming that early data suggests they’re doing well, keep in mind that’s this is not due to any artificial advantage in search: you can make a fantastic website that performs well in search on any TLD.”

There’s no question that there is room for additional gTLDs that make sense, but that’s the key — making sense. It’s not about shorter, more keyword rich names — as some with vested financial interests in the new gTLDs keep saying. If that were the case, new gTLDs like .xyz would never have been delegated.

There has been a flood of options and a land rush to secure the best property in this new online real estate, but that is where it seems to have ended for so many of these new gTLDs that don’t make sense. The CircleID post cited above says, “Even as new gTLDs grow exponentially in popularity, we are many years away from any scenario in which registrants have difficulty finding available, keyword-rich names in the new gTLD space.” I guess the question is: Do they want to find space there?

As the expansion of gTLDs brings about a massive range of new — and often similar — domain extensions, it increases the likelihood that consumers will be unsure which new gTLD extensions provide a secure and appropriate experience. Moreover, the process (or lack thereof) to secure one of these new gTLDs is often difficult and confusing, as noted in this GeekWire article titled, “Buying a new gTLD domain name? The process .sucks.”

For example, in this new world of hundreds of domain registration options, if I’m a photographer trying to decide on a domain name, I can choose .photography, .photo, .pics, .photos, .camera or .pictures. I may even consider .exposed or .digital, or perhaps I am the photography.guru. In this scenario, the average user could become overwhelmed and confused; not only in trying to choose an appropriate extension, but also in trying to figure out which registrar offers that extension. Similarly, their customers will now need to remember which similar sounding extension they need to type in to find their vendor. Or, perhaps they’ll just go with whoever resolves to .com because that’s what they know and trust. That’s why I elected to secure about two dozen personal domains on .com, where I had no problem registering domains to suit my needs and I know that .com will be here for the long haul.

Encouraging small business owners to put their online presence in the hands of unknown, untrusted and unestablished TLDs, where an unknown number of them likely won’t be around in the next year or two is simply bad business advice in my opinion. In addition to paying to rebrand themselves, they will need to have a high SEM budget to rank decently on a new gTLD, and then if that gTLD fails, they will have to pay to do it all over again on a different TLD. This is a real risk that is being totally glossed over. The real costs that should be discussed are those of building and marketing an online presence and the natural conclusion by those without a vested financial interest in seeing new gTLDs succeed is that it behooves small businesses to do that on a TLD with staying power, like .com.

Established companies like those cited in this NetworkWorld article have passed by the hundreds of new options to .com because they know that .com is a smart and secure investment. Similarly, The Domains reported recently that the week of Nov. 15 — only two weeks before Black Friday — 559 domain names ending in .com were registered containing the term “blackfriday.” During that same period, there were only 16 domain name registrations in the .blackfriday new gTLD extension. If there is such enthusiasm for new gTLDs and such a lack of availability in .com, as some have suggested, this wouldn’t happen.

There has been a lot of hype about new gTLDs and there’s no doubt that some people will find new gTLDs that work for them. Registrants should make the choice that works best for them, but they’re entitled to know all of the facts before making that decision. The better informed they are, the better decisions they will make.

The good news for those who make the decision to entrust their online business to a new gTLD and find it didn’t work out as expected, is that .com will still be there for them — just like it has been for the last 30 years – when they need to make the switch like so many others already have.

By Jeannie McPherson, Senior Manager of Corporate Communications, Verisign. More blog posts from Jeannie McPherson can also be read here.

Related topics: Domain Names, Top-Level Domains

Article source: http://www.circleid.com/posts/20141217_the_real_facts_about_new_gtlds/

Time to join hands in the spirit of ubuntu

DOC
Minister in the Presidency for Perfomance, Monitoring and Evaluation, Mr Jeff Radebe. File photo: Linda Mthombeni

The task of reconciling a nation is not merely the duty of the government alone but a societal responsibility, writes Jeff Radebe.

 

The task of reconciling and uniting people who for many years lived as adversaries was always going to be a painful and difficult task. Reconciliation affects every aspect of our life as a country. It is not a once-off event but a process. It demands that we work together and look beyond our differences. This is the legacy our founding father and former president Nelson Mandela left us with.

This year is the second time we observed National Reconciliation Day without Madiba but his legacy of a united and prosperous country lives on in each and every one of us. Tata was laid to rest on December 15 last year and we honoured his memory a day later with the unveiling of a 9m statue at the Union Buildings. He and other leaders, made enormous sacrifices for our country. Some paid with their lives so that we may be free and celebrate this day.

Together they achieved the impossible by convincing those who did not see eye to eye prior to 1994 to find each other and work towards building a country based on the values of our Constitution. Our Constitution lays the foundation for an open society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights and is regarded around the world as very progressive.

December 16 is used to foster reconciliation and national unity in the true spirit of our late icon as he had envisaged at the start of our democracy. It also serves as a reminder of how far we have come in uniting the country and of the challenges that still lie ahead.

This year’s commemoration under the theme: “Social Cohesion, Reconciliation and National Unity in the 20 years of Democracy” coincides with South Africa celebrating 20 years of freedom.

As a nation, we have come a long way in healing the wounds of the past and in building an inclusive society. The government has over the past 20 years provided leadership in creating an enabling environment for achieving this. It successfully laid the foundation for the removal of obstacles that divided our people on the basis of race, culture, religion or language.

As part of our reconciliation we began to ensure the equal spread of national resources. The government started to provide basic services such as water, sanitation, electricity, houses, health and education for those who were deprived prior to 1994.

Reconciliation also required the government to tackle the triple challenge of unemployment, poverty and inequality. We have taken decisive steps to promote economic growth through the implementation of the National Development Plan, the National Infrastructure Plan, the New Growth Path and the Industrial Policy Action Plan.

But the task of reconciling a nation is not merely the duty of the government alone but a societal responsibility. Through our collective effort and perseverance we can achieve the social harmony Mandela spoke about and be able to advance national reconciliation.

As citizens we need to reach out to each other and break down the barriers that still define us 20 years into our democracy.

We need to ask ourselves whether we have done enough to confront and overcome the stereotypes and myths entrenched over years under colonisation and apartheid. We remain concerned over the racism-related incidents across the country. They are unacceptable and go against our goal of building a society based on the ethos of ubuntu where everyone feels valued, respected and safe.

Reconciliation requires of us to confront our past and educate fellow South Africans of the past wrongs committed against black people. A major step towards reconciliation is to acknowledge that apartheid was a crime against humanity.

Addressing the National Council of Provinces in 1998, Madiba said: “What has been revealed in the TRC shows not only what human beings can do to other human beings, but has confirmed the condemnation by the international community that apartheid was a crime against humanity. To kill people without bringing them before a court of law; to bury them secretly; this is an illustration of how apartheid is an evil against humanity.”

It is disheartening that the 2014 SA Reconciliation Barometer, published by the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, shows that 25 percent of South Africans feel apartheid was not a crime. We should take this survey as a call to action to do more in educating and raising awareness about the injustices and violence perpetrated by the apartheid regime against the majority of people. The youth, in particular, should know our history to avoid repeating the same mistakes in the future.

*Jeff Radebe is Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.

Pretoria News


Article source: http://www.iol.co.za/pretoria-news/opinion/time-to-join-hands-in-the-spirit-of-ubuntu-1.1796430

Google Cloud gets ‘snappy’ with Ubuntu Core support

Canonical’s “snappy” new formulation of Ubuntu has gained the support of another major public cloud vendor, with Google making the lightweight Linux available for customers of its Compute Engine IaaS offering.

Announced earlier this month, Ubuntu Core is a stripped-down version of the OS designed specifically for large-scale cloud deployments running applications in Docker containers. Developed based on lessons learned from Canonical’s efforts to get Ubuntu running on phones, its compressed boot image clocks in at around 100MB.


Unusually, Microsoft was the first cloud vendor to get on board with the new effort, offering support for launching Ubuntu Core instances via its Azure command-line tools. With Tuesday’s announcement, Google, too, joins the party.

The idea of offering a no-frills Linux variant for Docker deployments isn’t unique to Ubuntu. It arguably originated with CoreOS, and even Red Hat has since come up with a bare-bones version of its Enterprise Linux.

But Ubuntu has the advantage of already being extremely popular for public cloud deployments. According to DigitalOcean – which web survey outfit Netcraft says is now the third-largest hosting provider in the world – more than two-thirds of all machine instances in its cloud are running Ubuntu.

What’s more, while Ubuntu Core provides a smaller OS footprint for running those workloads, it also offers an additional advantage, in the form of a new software update management system that Canonical is calling “snappy.”

Unlike traditional, package-based update systems, snappy updates are transactional. All data is backed up before an update is applied, and if the update fails for any reason, the system can be rolled back to its former state.

Snappy updates are also easier to manage than those in traditional Linux systems. Instead of applications being composed of multiple packages – even hundreds of packages – with various interdependencies, each snappy application is a single unit.

“I bet the average system on the cloud ends up with about three packages installed, total!” Canonical maestro Mark Shuttleworth mused in a blog post earlier this month. “That’s much easier to manage and reason about at scale.”

Some of those packages will be frameworks that provide services to other applications that depend on them. And the first such framework that’s available for Ubuntu Core is – surprise, surprise – Docker.

For now, however, the Ubuntu Core images should be considered either alpha or beta software – depending on which of Canonical’s marketing materials you read – and will remain so throughout Ubuntu’s current development cycle. But if you’d like to check it out on Google’s cloud now, Canonical has some instructions available here.

It also remains available on Azure and as a KVM virtual machine image for trying out locally.

The matter of when or if public cloud mega-giant Amazon Web Services will support Ubuntu Core, however, remains an open question. ®

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Article source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/12/16/ubuntu_core_on_google_cloud_platform/

Andromium could turn your smartphone into a desktop (crowdfunding)

Over the past few years there have been a few projects aimed at letting people use their smartphones as notebook or desktop computers.

Motorola’s Atrix line of Android phones were designed to work with Lapdock keyboard docks, but they’ve been discontinued. Canonical tried to breath new life into the category by crowdfunding the Ubuntu Edge smartphone which could also function as a desktop computer… but the company didn’t meet its ambitious fundraising goals.

Now a startup called Andromium is taking to Kickstarter to raise money for something a bit simpler: it’s an Android app and optional docking station that makes it easy to connect a phone to external hardware and run desktop-style apps.

andromium_02

Here’s the idea: install an app from the Google Play Store, drop your phone into a dock, and you can use a keyboard, mouse, monitor, and maybe even a game controller to interact with your phone.

The Andromium dock includes HDMI output, 3 USB ports, and a power connector for keeping your phone charged. The Andromium app, meanwhile, automatically detects when your phone is docked and switches the user interface to something that looks a bit more like Windows 7.

That means there’s a desktop, taskbar, and support for apps that run in windows that you can resize and move. This lets you run multiple apps side-by-side or on top of one another while using a keyboard, mouse, and monitor.

Andromium doesn’t change the operating system on your phone, so while there are built-in apps including a web browser, all your Android apps will also still be able to run. But they’ll run in full screen.

Background apps and services will also continue to run, so you’ll be able to take incoming phone calls, hear alarms, or receive other notifications even when your phone is docked.

Andromium’s developers hope to raise $100,000 to enhance the user interface and bring their hardware and software to market. Right now there are plans to support Samsung Galaxy and HTC One phones, as well as the Google Nexus 4, 5, and 6.

Technically any smartphone dock which supports USB input and USB-to-video output should work if you want to bring your own dock, but the team isn’t making any promises of support for hardware from third parties.

Andromium is an interesting concept… although it remains to be seen if it will be any more successful than the Motorola Atrix 4G or Ubuntu Edge. But it probably doesn’t have to be. The developers are seeking to raise a lot less money than the $32 million Canonical wanted for its project, and the hardware and software the team is offering seems pretty affordable. There’s no guarantee it’ll actually be useful, but even if it’s not, you probably won’t break the bank by backing the project.

Kickstarter backers can pledge $10 or more to get just the Andromium app in January, $29 or more to get an early version of the dock as well as the app in February, or $35 or more for the more polished versions the team hopes to ship in May and June. Full retail price is expected to be $40.

andromium_01

andromium_02

andromium_03

Article source: http://liliputing.com/2014/12/andromium-turn-smartphone-desktop-crowdfunding.html

2015 will be the year Linux takes over the enterprise (and other predictions)

Linux predictions

The crystal ball has been vague and fuzzy for quite some time. Every pundit and voice has opined on what the upcoming year will mean to whatever topic it is they hold dear to their heart. In my case, we’re talking Linux and open source.

In previous years, I’d don the rose-colored glasses and make predictions that would shine a fantastic light over the Linux landscape and proclaim 20** will be the year of Linux on the _____ (name your platform). Many times, those predictions were wrong, and Linux would wind up grinding on in the background.

This coming year, however, there are some fairly bold predictions to be made, some of which are sure things. Read on and see if you agree.

Linux takes over big data

This should come as no surprise, considering the advancements Linux and open source has made over the previous few years. With the help of SuSE, Red Hat, and SAP Hana, Linux will hold powerful sway over big data in 2015. In-memory computing and live kernel patching will be the thing that catapults big data into realms of uptime and reliability never before known. SuSE will lead this charge like a warrior rushing into a battle it cannot possibly lose.

This rise of Linux in the world of big data will have serious trickle down over the rest of the business world. We already know how fond enterprise businesses are of Linux and big data. What we don’t know is how this relationship will alter the course of Linux with regards to the rest of the business world.

My prediction is that the success of Linux with big data will skyrocket the popularity of Linux throughout the business landscape. More contracts for SuSE and Red Hat will equate to more deployments of Linux servers that handle more tasks within the business world. This will especially apply to the cloud, where OpenStack should easily become an overwhelming leader.

As the end of 2015 draws to a close, Linux will continue its take over of more backend services, which may include the likes of collaboration servers, security, and much more.

Smart machines

Linux is already leading the trend for making homes and autos more intelligent. With improvements in the likes of Nest (which currently uses an embedded Linux), the open source platform is poised to take over your machines. Because 2015 should see a massive rise in smart machines, it goes without saying that Linux will be a huge part of that growth. I firmly believe more homes and businesses will take advantage of such smart controls, and that will lead to more innovations (all of which will be built on Linux).

One of the issues facing Nest, however, is that it was purchased by Google. What does this mean for the thermostat controller? Will Google continue using the Linux platform — or will it opt to scrap that in favor of Android? Of course, a switch would set the Nest platform back a bit.

The upcoming year will see Linux lead the rise in popularity of home automation. Wink, Iris, Q Station, Staples Connect, and more (similar) systems will help to bridge Linux and home users together.

The desktop

The big question, as always, is one that tends to hang over the heads of the Linux community like a dark cloud. That question is in relation to the desktop. Unfortunately, my predictions here aren’t nearly as positive. I believe that the year 2015 will remain quite stagnant for Linux on the desktop. That complacency will center around Ubuntu.

As much as I love Ubuntu (and the Unity desktop), this particular distribution will continue to drag the Linux desktop down. Why?

Convergence… or the lack thereof.

Canonical has been so headstrong about converging the desktop and mobile experience that they are neglecting the current state of the desktop. The last two releases of Ubuntu (one being an LTS release) have been stagnant (at best). The past year saw two of the most unexciting releases of Ubuntu that I can recall. The reason? Because the developers of Ubuntu are desperately trying to make Unity 8/Mir and the ubiquitous Ubuntu Phone a reality. The vaporware that is the Ubuntu Phone will continue on through 2015, and Unity 8/Mir may or may not be released.

When the new iteration of the Ubuntu Unity desktop is finally released, it will suffer a serious setback, because there will be so little hardware available to truly show it off. System76 will sell their outstanding Sable Touch, which will probably become the flagship system for Unity 8/Mir. As for the Ubuntu Phone? How many reports have you read that proclaimed “Ubuntu Phone will ship this year”?

I’m now going on the record to predict that the Ubuntu Phone will not ship in 2015. Why? Canonical created partnerships with two OEMs over a year ago. Those partnerships have yet to produce a single shippable product. The closest thing to a shippable product is the Meizu MX4 phone. The “Pro” version of that phone was supposed to have a formal launch of Sept 25. Like everything associated with the Ubuntu Phone, it didn’t happen.

Unless Canonical stops putting all of its eggs in one vaporware basket, desktop Linux will take a major hit in 2015. Ubuntu needs to release something major — something to make heads turn — otherwise, 2015 will be just another year where we all look back and think “we could have done something special.”

Outside of Ubuntu, I do believe there are some outside chances that Linux could still make some noise on the desktop. I think two distributions, in particular, will bring something rather special to the table:

  • Evolve OS — a ChromeOS-like Linux distribution
  • Quantum OS — a Linux distribution that uses Android’s Material Design specs

Both of these projects are quite exciting and offer unique, user-friendly takes on the Linux desktop. This is quickly become a necessity in a landscape being dragged down by out-of-date design standards (think the likes of Cinnamon, Mate, XFCE, LXCE — all desperately clinging to the past).

This is not to say that Linux on the desktop doesn’t have a chance in 2015. It does. In order to grasp the reins of that chance, it will have to move beyond the past and drop the anchors that prevent it from moving out to deeper, more viable waters.

Linux stands to make more waves in 2015 than it has in a very long time. From enterprise to home automation — the world could be the oyster that Linux uses as a springboard to the desktop and beyond.

What are your predictions for Linux and open source in 2015? Share your thoughts in the discussion thread below.

Article source: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/2015-will-be-the-year-linux-takes-over-the-enterprise-and-other-predictions/

.XYZ Is The 1st New gTLD To Break 750000 Registered Domains

.XYZ has become the first new gTLD to break through the 750,000 mark for domain name registrations.

According to the .XYZ registry the number of registered domain names is 750,073

The 750,000th domain name to be registered was Chez.XYZ that was registered today at the domain name registrar Gandi.net.

We at TheDomains.com were the first to figure out that NetworkSolutions,  which is  part of the Web.com group (WWWW), were stuffing free .XYZ domain names into customer’s accounts when the extension first launched.

However the number of .XYZ domain names registered at Network Solutions currently sits at 376,612 and has been stalled at that level for a few months, so within a matter of  hours or days the percentage of .XYZ  domain name registered at Network Solutions will fall below 50%.

.XYZ is closing in on a legacy domain extension, .Mobi which sits around 830,000 registrations.

With the total number  of new gTLD registrations sitting around 3.5 Million that means that over 20% of all new gTLD registrations are .XYZ domain names.

You may love it or hate it but you can’t ignore it.

Even backing out all the “free” Network Solutions registrations .XYZ would have 350,000 registrations more than twice the number of domain names registrations under the second most registered new gTLD extension .Berlin (which also offered free registrations).

.XYZ didn’t launch until June 2nd of this year which is several months after the first new gTLD’s launched.

A lot of .XYZ registrations are coming from the Asian Market.

.XYZ has over 186,000 registrations from Xin Net in China and is featured on its home page:

xin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The second most registered new gTLD after .XYZ  at Xin Net is .Wang with under 8,000 registrations

.XYZ is also featured on the home page of onamae.com a large Japanese registrar which is owned and operated by GMO, group, has registered over 77,000 .XYZ domain names.

The next most registered new gTLD at  onamae.com is .Tokyo, with over 26,000 registrations:

gmo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes .XYZ is a very low priced, new gTLD extension, but there is obviously a market for it.

Congrats to .XYZ for hitting 750,000 domain name registrations.

Article source: http://www.thedomains.com/2014/12/16/xyz-is-the-1st-new-gtld-to-break-750000-registered-domains/

Andromium News: Andromium Lets Users Turn The Phone Into A Desktop! Will …

What if your smartphone can actually become your desktop? Since the release of the first smartphone, inventors have visualized the pocketable PC, a mighty powerful computer right in your pocket. Previous attempts like the Ubuntu Edge have proven too isolated to see success. Andromium, a new company founded to launch a Kickstarter for a product of the same name, aspires to avoid the fate to its forefathers by piggybacking popular devices. This Andromium Kickstarter wants to give you a real desktop experience.

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Although it may not match a desktop or even a laptop in power, however, it makes up for portability and convenience.

Andromium, in simple words is an alternative enviroment for Android that looks and feels like a desktop operating system. It not only has a taskbar but it’s also designed for a screen that is in landscape orientation and also provides full support for keyboard, mouse and monitor. All of this is enabled through a combination of a custom dock with video outputs, a combination of softwares and USB ports.

The dock is the size of a Roku and sports a flip cover that protects it during travel. Andromium originally was intended to only support the Samsung Galaxy line of smartphones, however, backer pressure has inspired the company to extend support to the HTC One, LG N4/N5, and the Nexus 6. Even “Large screen tablets” will be supported but the details on that are not clear.

The Andromium affirms it will come in two parts, hardware and software. The hardware part apparently is less exciting and comparitively easier to pull off. Basically, it is a smartphone dock with a dedicate HDMI port for connecting with an external display. Additionally, it feature three USB ports as that enables it to connect peripherals such as wireless keyboard and mouse combo and maybe a game controller. That part is not quiet challenging and can be accomplished with a few tricks a connectors; however, the entire point of the Andromium hardware is convenience and portability.

Andromium is after all a Kickstarter campaign, one that is looking for $100,000 to help develop the platform, specifically improve the OS. They are not asking much for a single piece, $29 for early birds. So far, the campaign has reached a tenth of its goal. Considering there are still 45 days left, there might be some hope that this dream will come true.

Article source: http://www.kpopstarz.com/articles/152049/20141216/andromium-news.htm